Midnight's Children Thesis

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Midnight’s Children by Salman Rushdie
(A Study On Postcolonial Innovations)

A Thesis Presented to the Department of Literature
College of Nursing

In Partial Fulfilment of the Requirement in
Literature 101
World Literatures

Tan, John Ryan N.

March 2012

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Dedication………………………………………………………………………………………..2 Acknowledgement………………………………………………………………………………3

CHAPTER

1 The Problem and its background
A: Introduction……………………………………………………………………….4 B: Statement of the Problem……………………………………………………...10 C: Objective of the Study………………………………………………………….10 D: Significance of the Study………………………………………………………11 E: Scope and Limitations………………………………………………………….13

2 Review of Related Literature and Studies………………………………………14 3 Summary…………………………………………………………………………. 18 4 Discussion and Analysis…………………………………………………………..28 5 Summary, Findings, Conclusion and Recommendations A: Summary of the Study………………………………………………………….83 B: Findings……………………………………………………………………….....83 C: Conclusion………………………………………………………………..……..83 D: Recommendations…………………………………………………………..…83

About the Author……………………………………………………………………………….86 Bibliography…………………………………………………………………………………….96

To the two who believed

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

To the following people, the researcher would like to express her utmost gratitude.

To my family, for supporting me in making this thesis on my own.

To my Literature professor Sir Elmer Hibek PhD, for the encouragement and guidance.

To Jella Ramirez, for providing the inspiration that the researcher needed as she herself has accomplished the year before.

To Nescafe Philippines, for providing the finest stimulant, making a 23-hour non-stop thesis marathon possible.

Finally I would like to thank all my colleagues and friends during this period of my life.

CHAPTER 1
THE PROBLEM AND ITS BACKGROUND

A. Introduction
"there is no magic on earth strong enough to wipe out the legacies of one's parents." - Salman Rushdie, Midnight's Children

When it was published in 1981, Midnight's Children won the Booker Prize, Great Britain's equivalent of the U.S. Pulitzer Prize; in 1993, the novel was awarded the "Booker of Bookers," a honor accorded to the best novel to be published in the competition's first twenty-five years. The book follows the life of Saleem Sinai, who is born at the very moment in 1947 when India gained its independence from British colonial rule. The infant Saleem is switched at birth with a child from a rich family and as a result leads a life of luxury until the mistake is discovered. Like the other children born that night, whom he dubs "the children of midnight," he finds himself to have mystical powers; despite the advantages conferred on him, Saleem's life takes him down paths of struggle and ruin before he is able to find peace.

Midnight's Children, roughly based on the early life of its author, Salman Rushdie, is considered a masterful blend of fiction, politics, and magic. Critics credit it with making the worldwide literary audience aware of the changes that India underwent throughout the twentieth century. With his masterful control of the English language and his ability to render even the most minute events in full, vivid details, Rushdie takes readers on an imaginative trip that makes them see his native country in a way that they never did before.

Midnight's Children is the first-person narrative of Saleem Sinai, an obscure thirty-year-old pickle factory worker who writes the fantastic story of his life each night, reading it aloud each night and having it commented on by a doting woman named Padma. He starts his story by describing how his grandfather...
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