Memory Recall History

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Bibliography
Cherry, Kendra. "Memory Retrieval: Retrieving Information from the Memory." About.com Psychology. The New York Times Company, n.d. Web. 22 Sept. 2012. Holladay, April. "How Does the Human Memory Work?" USA Today. WonderQuest, 15 Mar. 2007. Web. 24 Sept. 2012. Mastin, Luke. "Memory Recall/ Retrieval." The Human Memory. N.p., 2009. Web. 22 Sept. 2012. Miller, Greg. "How Are Memories Stored and Retrieved." Science Mag. AAAS, 1 July 2005. Web. 22 Sept. 2012. Mills, Kristen L., and Heather K. McMullan. "A Study of Short-Term Memory Recall with Pictures, Words, and Pictures and Words Presented Together." National Undergraduate Research Clearinghouse Site. Missouri Western State University, 22 Apr. 2004. Web. 22 Sept. 2012.

Memory Recall
Memory recall occurs when you access information stored in your brain without being cued. This occurs when you are remembering simple things or taking a test. Two other types of memory recall are recollection and recognition. Recollection is when you remember partial information. Recognition occurs when you identify information after experiencing it again (Cherry).

Memories are stored into your brain using medical temporal lobes, MLT (Miller). The job of MLT is to make memories using neural activities that are created in response to the senses (Mastin). Another part of the brain that helps with memories is the hippocampus. The job of the hippocampus is to contain the new memories in the long-term or short-term memory (Holladay).

One way of experimenting with memory recall was performed by Missouri Western State University. During this experiment people were given cards, some had just words, some had just pictures, and some had words and picture. These people were given a short amount of time until they were quizzed to see which group remembered what was on the card. The group that filled out the most information was the group that was given the words and pictures (Mills).
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