Making Perfume

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School Paper recycling using Organic Dye

Project by:
Sumber Myadagmaa
Tsatsral Byambadorj

Deforestation is one of the biggest problems that the world is facing. Thousands and thousands trees are cut down to make the paper that we use every day. Major labor is working as well to make the papers that we use every day. The question is what do we do with our waste papers? Most of us simply throw away the paper. Most of the countries have big paper plants. However how about educating the younger generation how hard paper is made. This is the topic that we tried to reach to and solve. The method that we use is common but we have used natural dye which makes our project special


Recycling one ton of paper saves 17 trees.
-Paper recycling history
Paper recycling has existed for almost as long as paper itself has: The first paper was made from repurposed fabric. Paper recycling as a modern municipal system began in the 19th century, when curbside pickup was first instituted, and sorting centers were opened. Soon, government agencies began passing laws requiring residences and businesses to recycle paper and other reusable materials. In the 21st century, paper recycling faces new issues, as advocates work to make the process as green as possible.

Paper made of recycled materials has been produced in the United States since 1690, when William Rittenhouse established a paper mill near what would become the city of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. His mill used recycled linens, specifically old rags and cotton, to make paper. This method of papermaking came from China, where it had been used since 105.

In 1031, Japan pioneered paper recycling when it began using waste paper to make new paper. All Japanese paper was repulped and made into new product for sale in paper stores. Around the time of the Declaration of Independence, Benjamin Franklin was using recycled scrap paper for...
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