Integrated Health Care

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 280
  • Published : November 27, 2010
Open Document
Text Preview

1. Discuss the American Health Care System. Can we implement it in India?

2. What is DOTS? How will you organize and implement DOTs Programme at a district level? Discuss in detail.

3. Describe the National Health Policy of India. What goals are to be achieved by 2010?

4. Write notes on
a. WHO
c. Health problems of Developing Nations.

5. Write notes on
a. National Anti Malarial Programme
b. National AIDS control programme

1. Discuss the American Health Care System. Can we implement it in India?

Ans :

American Health Care is the leading integrator of pharmacy benefit management (PBM), clinical pharmacy management (CPM), and disease and wellness management (DWM) in the nation:

PBM services integrate medical, laboratory, and pharmacy information to provide a multi-faceted picture of a patient’s medical status, and there is a nationwide network of pharmacies contracted at rates that are competitive at the national level.

American Health Care is committed to providing proactive CPM to positively impact the drug prescribing patterns of physicians and the drug utilization by plan members/patients. The by-products of such focused attention are improved health outcomes and decreased medical and pharmacy cost.

American Health Care is the champion of holistic patient care, aligning its internal and external resources to place what is best for the patient at the center of drug therapy decisions. DWM protocols or other therapeutic options must conform to the unique medical complexities of each patient.

As a provider of unbiased pharmacotherapy information, American Health Care is known for its integrity, ethics, and dedication to science. In its passionate pursuit of excellence, American Health Care is a recognized innovator of products, processes, and tools that result in better care for patients through advanced data integration technologies, clinical pharmacy, and disease/health management.

Health care in the United States is provided by many separate legal entities. Health care facilities are largely owned and operated by the private sector. Health insurance is primarily provided by the private sector, with the exception of programs such as Medicare, Medicaid, TRICARE, the Children's Health Insurance Program and the Veterans Health Administration.

At least 15.3% of the population is completely uninsured and a substantial additional portion of the population (35%) is "underinsured", or not able to cover the costs of their medical needs. More money per person is spent on health care in the United States than in any other nation in the world, and a greater percentage of total income in the nation is spent on health care in the U.S. than in any United Nations member state except for East Timor. Despite the fact that not all citizens are covered, the United States has the third highest public healthcare expenditure per capita. A 2001 study in five states found that medical debt contributed to 46.2% of all personal bankruptcies and in 2007, 62.1% of filers for bankruptcies claimed high medical expenses. Since then, health costs and the numbers of uninsured and underinsured have increased.

The US pays twice as much yet lags behind other wealthy nations in such measures as infant mortality and life expectancy, though the relation between these statistics to the system itself is debated. Currently, the U.S. has a higher infant mortality rate than most of the world's industrialized nations. The United States life expectancy lags 42nd in the world, after most rich nations, lagging last of the G5 (Japan, France, Germany, UK, USA) and just after Chile (35th) and Cuba (37th).

The USA's life expectancy is ranked 50th in the world after the European Union (40th). The World Health Organization (WHO), in 2000, ranked the U.S. health care system as the highest in cost, first in responsiveness, 37th in overall performance, and 72nd by overall level of health...
tracking img