Hca 305 Week 2 Assignment

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PATIENT PROTECTION & AFFORDABLE CARE ACT OF 2010 (P.P.A.C.A.)

HCA305: The U.S. Health Care System
Instructor Delana Chappell-James
January 14, 2013

PATIENT PROTECTION & AFFORDABLE CARE ACT OF 2010 (P.P.A.C.A.) Introduction
If there is one thing that most Americans are in agreement with, it is the vile shape of our U.S. health care system. There is no argument that the U.S. health care system is in need of an overhaul, however, there is much debate over just how to effectively go about the process. The public have voiced greatest concern in the health care areas of costs, quality and access. Many presidents have pondered the idea of health care reform; a few even made attempts to start the ball rolling. The first baby steps with the daunting task of health care reform were made on March 23, 2010, when President Obama signed into law the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA). Though some of the provisions and requirements are in force, many are set to be phased in over the next ten years. The PPACA is groundbreaking as it addresses consumer protections, the crucial role of employer-provided insurance coverage and government's role in providing health care access for the most vulnerable populations (Sultz & Young, 2011). The purpose of the P.P.A.C.A. of 2010 is to provide affordable health insurance to all Americans, improve access to primary care, improve the quality care through preventative care and maintenance, and reduce the growth in health care spending, in turn, reducing the federal deficit. A more in depth look at some of what the P.P.A.C.A. entails will be discussed along with pros and cons of the issues addressed. Whether applauded by those in support or attacked by those who opposition, the P.P.A.C.A. certainly is not the answer to all of our health care challenges, but, overall it is a positive effort and a start towards what will take a very long time to fully accomplish. The History Of The Law

The enactment of the P.P.A.C.A. was the result of several influences, all of which contributed to the excessive costs associated with the health care today. The Social Security Act of 1935, the Medicare and Medicaid programs, direct-aid to schools, government’s increased support of biomedical research through the National Institutes of Health, advancements in technology, and insurance companies inflationary effect were all contributors to health care’s sky-rocketing costs. Furthermore, with no effective controls over expenditures, the planners of the Medicare legislation made several misjudgments; they underestimated the growing number of older adults in the United States, the scope and burgeoning costs of the technologic revolution, and the public's rising expectations for the latest in every diagnostic and treatment modality (Sultz & Young, 2011). These influences played a major role in the U.S. health care costs now exceeding $2 trillion and consuming about 17% of the gross national product. The P.P.A.C.A. was established due to all these circumstances and more. Description Of The Law

The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (P.P.A.C.A.), often referred to as federal health care reform, or “ObamaCare” is legislation that will change how millions of Americans access health care coverage. The scope of the P.P.A.C.A. is so extensive that it will be years before all of its provisions will be fully implemented and its effects fully understood. Furthermore, the federal government will publicize regulations over the next few years that will clarify P.P.A.C.A. and give more detailed guidance on how many of its provisions are to be implemented. The following are some of the key facts of the P.P.A.C.A. First, it establishes stronger consumer rights and protection by putting an end to pre-existing condition discrimination, limits on care, and coverage cancellations. These provisions will aid in protecting against being taken advantage of by insurance companies....
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