Increased Fitness Trends a Result of Increased Obesity

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Increased “Quick-Fix” Fitness Trends a Result of Increased Obesity

About one third of adults and one fifth of children and teens are obese (CDC). This rate has increased at alarmingly high rates over the past 25 years. Along with these increased obesity rates, people are realizing how unhealthy this particular lifestyle has become, and as an effect, have grown the fitness industry tremendously. You can’t watch a television show without seeing at least two commercials bragging about the latest “get-in-shape-fast” gadget invading your living room, or the fastest diet pill making its home in your medicine cabinet. L.A. Fitness and 24-Hour Fitness locations have sprung up all over the country. People have turned to Zumba and personal trainers to whoop their butts into shape. However, even with all of these trends, Americans are spending over $40 billion on diet and weight loss plans and products, and those same people are spending years and years trying to get that “perfect shape.” This is great news for the American economy, but discouraging news for those affected by obesity. Since 1985, obesity rates in the United States have more than doubled on average in each state, rising from a national average of 13% to 33%.(CDC) This was a result of higher fat content in fast food and home prepared meals, lower amounts of physical activity and poor nutrition. Americans have had seemingly unlimited amounts of food, which leads to overeating (NIH). With the economy taking a turn for the worst over the past thirty years, stress levels and the amount of diagnosed depressed adults has increased as well, which has been shown to increase body fat levels as well. America became the “fat” country of the world, always being looked down upon by other nations for our health issues. It became the American way, obesity was seen as just another part of America, along with baseball and warm, delicious (and not very healthy at that), apple pie. However, in the past ten years, Americans...
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