Happy Workers Are Productive Worker

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A happy or satisfied worker can have many reasons; he/she can have a high salary, good working hours, bonus holidays, or an excellent position in the company. Every individual is satisfied differently. But do happy workers stay over-time or perform better than unhappy workers?

According to the book, Organizational Behavior, organizations with more satisfied employees tend to be more effective than organizations with fewer satisfied employees. Happy workers are now related to organizational citizenship behavior (OCB). OCB is when an employee will go beyond his/her usual work load. Also, when an individual is satisfied or happy he/she will perform well with customers. Customer satisfaction leads to customer loyalty which will eventually lead to an increase in productivity. Most importantly, happy workers are less likely to be absent from work.

Many researchers have been dealing with this issue because the cost of happy workers is an easy and efficient way of increasing productivity. According to an article by Kathleen Gage, she explains that satisfied employees are a powerful marketing strategy. She gives a personal example in her article about a pet shop. Every time she would visit the pet shop, the employees would bad mouth their manager and not bother to help the customer. The actions of the workers made Kathleen uncomfortable, and she decided to change her pet shop. She states that managers seem to think that investment in their workers is a waste of time and money. But have they ever thought that this could be the reason for such low productivity and morale and poor customer service?

Kathleen Gage concludes her article by mentioning that a little respect for your team can be a key to success. And “remember always that without your staff you are not likely to succeed”.

Works Cited:
Organizational Behavior, Stephen Robbins, Timothy Judge
Satisfied Employees, A Powerful Marketing Strategy, Kathleen Gage (2004)...
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