Globalization of Media

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Section A Please complete ALL parts

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Plagiarism - work presented in an assessment must be the student's own. Plagiarism is where a student copies from another source, published or unpublished (including work of a fellow student) and fails to acknowledge the influence of another's work or to attribute quotes to the author. Plagiarism in an assessment offence (see actions Section 11: Regulations of the Student Course Handbook, pp. 78-81).

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Section C

Tutor’s Comments

The globalization of the media is endorsing and creating a global village. The media-scape is restructuring itself, forming a singular global body, as opposed a mass of multiple independents. Media globalization is a direct result of technological development, maximisation of corporate media interest, the media's increasing correspondence to the public sphere, and media ownership. It is widely evident that the media is in fact becoming a global conglomerate, which is in turn endorsing the emergence of a single global village ( Jan, 2009). Mass media is a term which highlights the means of delivering impersonal communications to a vast audience. The concept of globalization corresponds to capacity of human social organizations to reach one another across separate regions and continents, whilst expanding power relations. Such allows for the growing integration of the globe as a united entity. Media globalization is a direct result of technological development, maximisation of corporate media interest, the media's increasing correspondence to the public sphere, and media ownership. The global village has evolved to become more than simply a mass media monopoly, but also an endeavour for political dominance, headed by the Untied States of America. It is widely evident that the media is in fact becoming a global conglomerate, which is in turn endorsing the emergence of a single global village ( Jan, 2005). Technological developments and electronic advancements have closed the gap between separate nations, and as a result have aided the mass media in becoming a global body. Faster and cheaper communications have proven imperative towards the developments of globalization, critical to innovation, production, growth and job creation. The 1990's called for the acceleration and rapid advancements in relation to digital transmission. As a result of these developments digital communication networks, including the Internet, are redeveloping the media-scape. It can be argued that the capabilities of technology within the field of communications and the mass media outweigh the potential and expectations of monetary focused monopolizers currently in power. Technology will allow for a more democratic media-scape which calls for public involvement and wider interaction. It is this representation of technology and the public which will support the media as it directs us towards a united global village ( Leary, 2005).  

[pic]Competition and innovation from a technological point of view have formulated three trends which support the globalization movement. These include; `The Rise of Data' (the growth of data transmission is now beyond traditional `voice traffic'), `The Internet' (emergence of e-commerce and digital network structures), and `Wireless Networking' (affordable and increased connectivity). The Information Revolution and the progression of technology are able to impact upon globalization in such an effective manner, based on their potential to influence a diverse array of international affairs and institutions. These include security, politics, the economy, society and culture, as the roles of government policymakers are altered. Information...
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