Functional Area Interrelationships Outline

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FUNCTIONAL AREA INTERRELATIONSHIPS
By
Beatriz Fajardo, Professor Barbra Hart
BUS 475 Integrated Business Topics
August 23, 2012

Functional Area Interrelationships
Introduction: We will be discussing the organization existence and structure, functional collaboration, lateral and vertical collaboration, and stakeholders. I. Target’s Origins
A. History
1. Founded in 1881
George Draper Dayton
Minneapolis, MN
Dayton Dry Goods Company
Mission, Values, Goals
1. Mission Statement: “Our mission is to make Target the preferred shopping destination for our guests by delivering outstanding value, continuous innovation and an exceptional guest experience by consistently fulfilling our Expect More, Pay Less ® brand promise.” * “To support our mission, we are guided by our commitments to great value, the community, diversity and the environment.” Number one preferred shopping store

Deliver the best value, and continued innovation, best brand Values are delivering the best customer service and continue working with the community Goals are to keep their promise to Expect More, Pay less

Organizational Structure of Target
A. Target uses a functional structure for its organization. 1. This form divides by departments of specialties
A. This promotes specialized learning and skill use
B. More engagement and concern over specifics of specialties C. Maximizes efficiency within the specialties
D. Less concern with the overall business
Target’s organizational chart
1. Steinhafel Chairman & CEO, Gregg – Chairman & CEO A. Scovanner, Douglas – EVP & CFO
B. Scully, Terrence – President, Target Financial Services C. Griffith, John – EVP, Property Development
D. Kozlak, Jodeen – SVP, Human Resources
E. Tesija, Kathryn – SVP, Merchandising
1. Anderson, Stacia – President, Target Sourcing Services 2. Adams, Patricia – SVP, Merchandising
3. Jones, Keri – VP, Merchandising
F. Fisher, Tony – President, Target Canada
4. Berg, Bryan – SVP, Stores, Target Canada
5. Maguire, Richard – SVP, Supply Chain, Target Cananda G. Jacob, Beth – EVP & CIO
Collaboration process action plan for functional organization A. Add specific information to the workings of the business strategy 1. Community Outreach – donate $3 million per week to local schools Focus on design

E. “Design is about more than just good looks. It’s about creating solutions that surprise and delight our guests.” Stores – “Expect more food for less”
All sections of the department should think of how their part affects the rest of the business. 1. Ask: Does this idea follow the overall company strategy? Lateral collaboration or better known as horizontal communication is communication within the organization that allows the message to flow across functional areas at a given level of an organization. A. Employees within the same level are allowed to communicate effectively without going through several levels of the organization. 1. Gives the elasticity to effectively solve a problem, communicate information within departments. a) Examples:

(1) Companies in the same market
(2) Alliances, Partnerships, Network Organizations (3) Collaborate in some markets, compete in others (4) Co-workers, Peers, Team leaders, Supervisors, Management, Senior, Executives. (5) Management in the same supply chain

B. Vertical Collaboration structure within the business where communication flows from upper level to lower level. This type of structure is implemented in many organizations. 2. Vertical collaboration creates one point of authority to make decisions that executes and implements plans and actions. b) Examples:

(1) General manager- senior- dept. manager-supervisor- employees (2)...
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