Easa Module 7

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Module 7 Essay Questions

1) Describe how tooling is controlled in a part 145 maintenance organisation.

Introduction

Tool control within a part 145 maintenance organisation can be divided in two main areas, the control of company supplied tools and the individual control of their own personal tooling. Tool control is a part 145 requirement

Safety

Good tool control is essential to prevent any tooling from becoming a foreign object which might cause an obstruction, restriction or any other type of damage. Tools should be checked before use for serviceability and operators should be trained to use them to prevent damage to the aircraft and personnel. The whereabouts of all personal and company tools should be known at all times.

Company Supplied Tooling

Tooling should be controlled in a secure tool store which controls and records the issue of all tools. Details of who the tools are issued to and which aircraft it is being used on should be kept at all times to ensure the whereabouts of all tools are known. This is a safety precaution to ensure that there no tolling is accidently left on the aircraft at any time. Tools should be kept in a controlled storage environment in kits or shadow boards and have individual serial numbers. The store keeper should also maintain a list of all tools that require calibration and ensure that all tools are properly calibrated. If any tools are un-calibrated or unserviceable, these tools should be properly labelled and stored in a separate area before being sent for repair or calibration. The store inspector should also perform regular audits on all the tooling in his store to ensure that they are in a good condition and are serviceable.

Personal Tool kits

Personal tool kits should contain a full contents list so that effective tool checks can be made. All tools should be checked at the beginning and at the end of each shift and when the aircraft is released to service. This is again a safety precaution to prevent any tools from being left on the aircraft accidentally. Shadow boarding and a list or the counting of tools used can be an effective way of monitoring all the tools being used. There is also a new requirement in my company where all personal tools should be inscribed with the name of their owners. This is to create an accountability of all tools that a person owns and prevent these tools form going missing or being stolen. Any personal tools that require calibration should be calibrated and monitored to ensure serviceability. Besides that, all personnel should ensure that their tools are always clean and in a serviceable condition at all times.

Company procedures

All part 145 maintenance organisations should have detailed company procedures for tools control in their maintenance exposition. These procedures should state rules for daily tool checks, lost or damaged tool procedures, aircraft pre-release checks and calibration requirements. It should also have a procedure for regular audits to be conducted to ensure compliance with the above requirements.

Summary

Good tool control is essential in helping to preserve flight safety but it requires close monitoring, good communication and constant vigilance from all personnel. Tool control is the responsibility of everybody.

2) On a major hangar inspection, you find corrosion on a panel on an unpressurised area of the fuselage. Detail your action to return the aircraft to service.

Introduction

Before starting any work, ensure that the aircraft and the environment around the area affected is safe to work on. Assuming that the aircraft is in for a major check, all electrical and hydraulic power should be switched off. If the area affected is part of a flight...
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