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Demo

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  • October 17, 2013
  • 408 Words
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I agree with your explanation and your answer about the two examples of persuasion that are not valid arguments according to the text. I can relate to the scare tactic persuasion because I have been in situations, in the Army, where this type of persuasion is used quite often. One good memory that comes to mind is in the U.S Army Flight School. Instructors wanted all of us to memorize flight emergency procedures. We were threatened and often yelled at by the instructors about memorizing all the emergency procedures. If we didn’t know the emergency procedure when asked, we were told that we would have to pack our bags and be sent home that day with a possibility of our Army careers being jeopardized. Some students were sent home because they failed to memorize the emergency procedures, and based on the situation, some were given a second chance. The flight instructors were trying to scare the students “into doing something or a position by using scare tactics” (Moore, Parker, & Rosenstand, 2009,Ch. 6 More Rhetorical Devices: Psychological and Related Fallacies). Reference:

(Moore, Parker, & Rosenstand, 2009,Ch. 6 More Rhetorical Devices: Psychological and Related Fallacies).

Demonstrative communication is when an expression made either by tone or body language. When it comes to nonverbal and unwritten communication facial expressions can demonstrate on exactly how the individual feels about the message. The response will be given efficiently because message was set up to allow receiver to give positive feedback. Demonstrative communication can be ineffective if the receiver misinterprets the message. An example would be when the receiver is from a different culture and the message is interpreted in a way sender did not want to convey. Thus the message deliverance is not accomplished because feedback from decoding message is negative. Demonstrative communication uses the influence of messages with tone of voice and body language with interpretation. Thus sender...