Consumer Behaviour

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 27
  • Published : May 9, 2013
Open Document
Text Preview
MODULE TITLE: Consumer Behaviour – Theory and Practice

STUDENT’s NAME: Naman Agrawal

STUDENT’s I.D.: c7093936

COURSE: B.A (hons) International Business

MODULE TUTOR: Mr Anil Kumar

ASSESSOR(S): Katrin Horn

Page-1

CONTENTS
1. Question2 Part (a)
2.1 Introduction
2.2 General Issues about Consumer Culture/ and General Issues 2.3 Critical Analysis

2. Question 2 Part (b)
3.4 Current Examples of Advertising that attempts to influence consumer attitude

3. Conclusion
4.5 Recommendation and Conclusion Part (a)
4.6 Recommendation and Conclusion Part (b)

4. Appendix
5.7 Samsung
5.8 Fortune oil
5.9 The Economic Times

5. Reference

Page-2

1. Question2 (a) Critically discuss and analyse the phenomenon of compulsive shopping, with a particular focus on the rise of consumerism and the role marketing plays

1.1 Introduction

What is compulsive shopping?
An Addictive and compulsive buying is all about the physiological and/or psychological dependency on purchasing product or services. It is an addictive experience as an act of shopping. It occurs because of post modernity and consumer culture, shopping as the source for identity and securing one’s place in society. (Helga Dittmar, n.d.)

Almost 5.8% of people are compulsive shoppers (5.5% are men, 6.0 are women). Rise of internet shopping and obvious consequences leads to compulsion. Today the diagnostic manual DSM-IV-TR (American Psychiatric Association, 2000), Compulsive buying is still the part of residual category. “Disorders of impulse Control Not Otherwise specified”, broadly it occurs in three core features of compulsive buying: * The urge to buy is experienced as irresistible

* Individuals lose control over their buying behaviour, they continue with excessive buying despite adverse consequences in their social, personal or occupational lives * Financial debt

These all features are consistent with proposed diagnostic criteria for compulsive buying, which emphasise a “maladaptive preoccupation with buying or shopping”.

Page-3
An example of compulsive buying, which was collected buy the survey done:

Mr Kashiv Roman, 23 years old, there was impulse buying, whenever he sees any new gadget in a store he likes, he must have it the very next day, he can’t stop himself. Most of the time it was not only gadgets but also perfumes and watches, it was always a branded watch which lifts him up. But put the gadgets in the locker to hide it from his father. It is his entire fault. Since he wasn’t having money of his own he started spending through the credit cards. He use to say that it is very easy doing shopping through credit card’s purchase as the credit limits are increased without consideration of whether they are able to pay the money back. When he had Rs1, 00,000 (£1333) of debt on his credit cards, he decided to take out a loan. Now he is paying back Rs 8325(£111) per month. With the interest his repayment will increase by 11% in whole year. Although the above example shows impulsive buying but he also shows signs of compulsive buying. The only difference between compulsive buying and impulsive buying is the whole cognitive process which leads a person to associate a prompt readjustment of his affective disequilibrium to the buying act. We can point out three forces that combine to form the basis for the process of engaging in the compulsive buying act: * A high cognitive control

* A high reactivity
* A strong emotional activation
(Journal of consumer policy, 1988)
The above example shows these three forces.

Page-4
1.2 General Issues about Consumer culture/ and general issues

Define culture?
“Culture is more often a source of conflict than of synergy. Cultural differences are a nuisance at best and often a disaster.” (Prof. Geert Hofestede, Emeritus Professor, Maasterich University, n.d.) In Consumer culture...
tracking img