Child Labour

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  • Topic: Child labour, International Labour Organization, Labour law
  • Pages : 15 (5055 words )
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  • Published : April 21, 2013
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MINISTRY OF THE EDUCATION AND SCIENCE OF THE REPUBLIC OF KAZAKHSTAN UNIVERSITY OF INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS

Department of International Programs
Chair of Management
The course “Organization of Business”

TERM PAPER
ON TOPIC “The causes and consequences of Child Labour”

Developed by: Busygina Mariya, Student ID # ___15123_______
major “Management”, the group # 10.115
Submitted to : Aigul E Kazhenova, MA
Senior lecturer

Almaty, 2013

Content:

* Introduction…………………………………………………………………………3 * Chapter1
* Characteristics of Child Labour
* Origin of child labour
* Magnitude of child labour
* Major sectors where children work
* Chapter2
* The causes and consequences of child
* Child labour in the modern world
* Forms of child labour
* Action against child labour
* Child labour laws

* Conclusion…………………………………………………………………………..23 * References…………………………………...………………………………………24

Introduction:

Child labor is a serious problem in many parts of the world, especially in developing countries. Labor is defined as physical or mental work especially of the hard or tiring kind. Child labor usually means work that is done by children under the age of 15, which restricts or damages their physical, emotional, intellectual, social, or spiritual growth as children. The International Labor organization estimates that there are 250 million children worldwide, between the ages of 5 and 14, who are now working. Africa and Asia together account for over 90 percent of total child employment. Child labor is especially common in the rural areas of these countries. Usually there are no age requirements for schooling or for work. There are many reasons that these children work: poverty, lack of education, lack of knowledge of one’s rights and cultural tradition are all contributing factors. These children are often working in severe and hazardous conditions. These children are deprived and mistreated. They are often beat or severely punished for making even the slightest mistakes. They receive low wages and perform tasks that are usually the work of adults. The International Labour Office reports that children work the longest hours and are the worst paid of all laborers. These children can be found working on farms, in factories or mines, and even fighting in wars. 

What is child labour

Not all work done by children should be classified as child labour that is to be targeted for elimination. Children’s or adolescents’ participation in work that does not affect their health and personal development or interfere with their schooling, is generally regarded as being something positive. This includes activities such as helping their parents around the home, assisting in a family business or earning pocket money outside school hours and during school holidays. These kinds of activities contribute to children’s development and to the welfare of their families; they provide them with skills and experience, and help to prepare them to be productive members of society during their adult life. The term “child labour” is often defined as work that deprives children of their childhood, their potential and their dignity, and that is harmful to physical and mental development. It refers to work that:

* is mentally, physically, socially or morally dangerous and harmful to children; and * interferes with their schooling by:
* depriving them of the opportunity to attend school;
* obliging them to leave school prematurely; or
* requiring them to attempt to combine school attendance with excessively long and heavy work.

In its most extreme forms, child labour involves children being enslaved, separated from their families, exposed to serious hazards and illnesses and/or left to fend for themselves on the streets of large cities – often at a very early...
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