Child Abuse

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s): 65
  • Published: April 2, 2013
Read full document
Text Preview
Child Abuse
Terry Hall Jr.
Kaplan University
CJ-102-02

Child Abuse

In today’s time we as parents are not sure what we can and cannot do to our own children punishment wise. There are so many new laws that arise when it comes to abuse that it is getting harder and harder to discipline your children without the fear of child abuse. Child abuse cab ad does take on many forms such as domestic violence, drugs and alcohol abuse and of course abuse of the child. Most children who are being abused in any form can form a biochemical condition known as antisocial behavior. This is where a child stays to themselves and doesn’t play with other children and makes excuses for bumps or bruises or even burn marks that they might have. They may even act out some just to get attention from a teacher or other adults due to not getting it from home. (seigel,2007.p.110). There are different types of abuse and they are:

Physical Abuse
When people think of child abuse, their first thought probably is of physical abuse — such as striking, kicking, or shaking a child. Physical abuse can also include: * holding a child under water

* tying a child up
* intentionally burning a child or scalding a child with hot water * throwing an object at a child or using an object to beat a child * starving a child or failing to provide a child with food Sexual Abuse

Sexual abuse happens when a child is raped or forced to commit a sexual act. But it's also any sort of sexual contact with a child or any behavior that is meant to sexually arouse the abuser. So, in addition to having sex with a child, fondling a child's genitals or making a child touch someone else's genitals, sexual abuse also includes: * making a child pose or perform for pornographic pictures or videos * telling a child dirty jokes or stories

* showing a child pornographic material
* forcing a child to undress
* "flashing" a child or showing them one's genitals
Neglect
Neglect is any action — or inaction — on the part of a caregiver that causes a child physical or emotional harm. For example, withholding food, warmth in cold weather, or proper housing is considered neglectful. Basically, anything that interferes with a child's growth and development constitutes neglect. This also includes: * failing to provide medical care when a child is injured or sick * locking a child in a closet or room

* placing a child in a dangerous situation that could lead to physical injury or death Abandonment is a type of neglect. This occurs when a child is left alone for extended periods of time or suffers serious harm because no one was looking after him or her. Emotional Abuse

Emotional abuse or psychological abuse is a pattern of behavior that has negative effects on a child's emotional development and sense of self-worth. Ignoring a child or withholding love, support, or guidance is considered emotional abuse. So is threatening, terrorizing, belittling, or constantly criticizing a child. Substance Abuse

The use of alcohol, tobacco, or illicit drugs can hinder a caregiver's judgment and put a child in danger, leading to things like neglect or physical abuse. But in some states, substance abuse is also considered a form of child abuse on its own. Examples of child abuse due to a substance abuse problem in the house include: * allowing a child to drink alcohol or take illegal drugs * manufacturing, ingesting, or distributing illegal drugs in the presence of a child * exposing a fetus to illegal drugs or other substances while pregnant. There are always going to be positive and negatives on the impact of these families that happen to be in these situations. Now here in any town, Ky the department of jobs and family services implemented a recent policy regarding the issue of child endangerment. It states that any household that has one or more documented offenses of domestic violence, child abuse, or drug alcohol related offenses committed...
tracking img