Celta Assignment 1

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CELTA Assignment 1

I’ve been waiting here for two hours.

1. Meaning
I was waiting here 2 hours ago.
I am still waiting here.

2. Form
Subject + have/has + past participle (been) + present participle

3. Pronunciation
Contraction of I and have. Been has a short /i/. Stress on ‘/Wei/’ in waiting.

4. Eliciting
Show picture 1 of a man standing with a clock above his head. The time is 12pm. Show picture 2 of the man still standing but the clock now says 2pm and he looks unhappy while looking at his watch. Ask – What is he doing? He’s waiting.

How long for? 2 hours.
Is he still waiting? Yes
To elicit – “so give me a sentence, I....”

5. Concept Questions
Was he waiting 2 hours ago? Yes
Is he still waiting now? Yes

6. Anticipated Difficulties + Solutions
Form: Subject +have/has + past participle (been) + present participle. Students might say I has or he have. They may say “I’m waiting for 2 hours”. They may say “wait” instead of “waiting”. Solution: Drill. Highlight form on whiteboard.

Phonology: Students might wrongly pronounce been by extending the “ee”. /i:/ rather than /i/. Students might not use the contraction I’ve, you’ve, he’s etc. Students might put stress on wrong syllables. Solution: Drill and model on fingers, write phonemes on whiteboard.

Concept: Students might think “waiting” only refers to something that happens now. Solution: Draw timeline on whiteboard

It suits you -versus- It fits you

1. Meaning

Suits:
It looks good on you.
You and the item go well together.

Fits:
It’s not too small for you.
It’s not too big for you
It’s the right size for you.
It’s the right shape for you.

2. Form
(For both) Subject + present simple +s + Object

3. Pronunciation
Fits – Stress on whole word.
Suits – ui sounds like /u:/.

4. Eliciting
Fits:
Show students a picture of a man wearing clothes which are too small for him. Ask – Are the clothes too big or small for him? Yes
Show students a picture of a man with clothes that fit him.
Ask – Are the clothes too big or small for him? No
To elicit – “So, the clothes.....”
[pic]

[pic]

Suits:
Show students a picture of a man wearing a pink jumper with flowers on it. Ask – does this look good on him? No
Show students a picture of a man with a nice shirt on.
Ask – Does this look good on him? Yes
To elicit – “The shirt......”

[pic]

[pic]

5. Concept Questions
Fits:
Is it too big for you? No
Is it too small for you? No
Is it the right size for you? Yes
Suits:
Does it look bad on you? No
Does it look good on you? Yes

6. Anticipated Difficulties + Solutions

Form: Subject + base form + Object – For fits, the students might get the subject and the object mixed up and say; “I fit it”, whereas, “I suit it” is acceptable. Students may drop the inflected s in third person form, or add it to other forms, eg. It suit me, I suits it. Solution: Drill and highlight form on whiteboard.

Phonology: Students may mispronounce suit as /sju:ts/.
Solution: Drill and model on fingers, write phonemes on whiteboard.

Concept: Students could mix up the meanings.
Solution: Ask CCQs and correct when appropriate

Other:
Suit and fit can act as synonyms in another meaning. For example, “music that fits my mood” is the same as “music that suits my mood”. This meaning has nothing to do with being too big/small or looking good/bad. If students already know this meaning, it could pose a problem. Solution: If students know the other meaning of suit and fit, explain that that meaning is different. Explain that many words in English have various meanings.

I wish I didn’t live in London

1. Meaning
I live in London.
I don’t want to live in London.
I have no plans to move from London.

2. Form
Subject + base form + subject + past simple+not

3. Pronunciation
Weak /t/ in didn’t. Stress on wish.

4. Eliciting
Show a picture of a man with a speech bubble above his head saying “I don’t like living in London...
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