Case Study Bob Knowlton

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Outline

Overview

Leadership & Leadership Style

Attribution Theory of Leadership

Bass (1) theory of Leadership

Important keys of leadership

Questions

What attributions did Bob Knowlton make?
What team norms seemed to be operating in Knowlton’s team? What leadership style did Knowlton need from Dr. Jerrold after Fester arrived? Explain. What leadership style did Knowlton seem to get from Dr. Jerrod before and after Fester arrived What leadership style did Fester use with his subordinates?

What leadership style did Knowlton use with Fester? Was it effective? Explain. What would you have done with Fester if you were Knowlton?
What would you have done to influence Dr. Jerrold if you were Knowlton?

Conclusion

Bob Knowlton

Overview

The Case (Bob Knowlton) depicts how inappropriate leadership styles can greatly influence employee’s performance and commitment to their organization. It also shows the impact that ineffective leadership can have on communication, teamwork, and the organization as a whole. The main characters are Bob Knowlton, whom was the Laboratory Leader, Dr Jerrold whom was the Director and Fester the new hire.

Bob was promoted to be the leader of the Laboratory by Dr. Jerrold, (whom was the head of the lab), as he saw that Bob had the necessary skill set to oversee certain projects. Fester (whom Dr. Jerrold thought very highly of) was hired after, by Dr. Jerrold, without any formal introduction to the group, which in turn offset a series of animosity, and insecurity issues…

An organization has the greatest chance of being successful when all employees, crucify self, focus on the company’s vision, and work towards achieving it. Since leadership involves the exercise of influence by one person over others, the quality of leadership exhibited by supervisors is therefore a critical determinant of organizational success.

Leadership & Leadership StyleLeadership is a complex process by which a person influences others to accomplish a mission, task, or objective and directs the organization in a way that makes it more cohesive and coherent. A person carries out this process by applying her/his leadership attributes (belief, values, ethics, character, knowledge, and skills). Although the position as a manager, supervisor, lead, etc. gives the authority to accomplish certain tasks and objectives in the organization, this power does not make one a leader...it simply makes you the boss. Leadership makes people want to achieve high goals and objectives, while, on the other hand, bosses tell people to accomplish a task or objective. Good leaders are made not born. If one has the desire and willpower, then they can become an effective leader. Good leaders develop through a never-ending process of self-study, education, training, and experience. The Attribution Theory of Leadership

The early conceptualization of leadership was that leaders are characterized by certain enduring traits that predispose them to leadership roles. This view was later superseded by theories of leadership style, and then contingency theories, where leader behavior was approached, as an interaction of leader, follower, and environment. Bass (1) Theory of LeadershipBass' HYPERLINK "http://www.nwlink.com/~donclark/leader/leadcon.html" \l "one" (1) theory of leadership states that there are three basic ways to explain how people become leaders. The first two explain the leadership development for a small number of people, these theories are: Trait Theory. Some personality traits may lead people naturally into leadership roles. Events Theory. A crisis or important event may cause a person to rise to the occasion, which brings out extraordinary leadership qualities in an ordinary person. Transformational Leadership TheoryPeople can choose to become leaders, also people can learn leadership skills,...
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