Business Communication

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Business Communication Assignment

Submitted By:

Ajit Kumar K (F-214)
Amit Gupta (Ph.D 10/03)
Manoranjan Kumar (F-179)
Indushree Gokak (F-106)
Sumedha Agarwal (Ph.D 10/01)
Nishant Verma(F-182)
Ajit Kumar K (F-214)
Amit Gupta (Ph.D 10/03)
Manoranjan Kumar (F-179)
Indushree Gokak (F-106)
Sumedha Agarwal (Ph.D 10/01)
Nishant Verma(F-182)

Table of Contents

7 C’s of effective business communication2
Report9
Negotiations10
Barriers to Communication15
Persuasive letters20
Compare and contrast the eastern and western communication styles26
Corporate Communication31

7 C’s of effective business communication
1. Completeness - The communication must be complete. It should convey all facts required by the audience. The sender of the message must take into consideration the receiver’s mind set and convey the message accordingly. The sender should answer all the questions and with facts and figures and when desirable, go for extra details. Complete communication not only develops but also enhances and enhances the reputation of an organization. Moreover, they are cost saving as no crucial information is missing and no additional cost is incurred in conveying extra message if the communication is complete. A complete communication always gives additional information wherever required. It leaves no questions in the mind of receiver. Complete communication helps in better decision-making by the audience/ readers/ receivers of message as they get all desired and crucial information. It is a very effective tool to persuade the audience. For Example- Due to lack of completeness a distributor, when replying to a dealers letter, answered only four of seven questions because the original questions were unnumbered and somewhat buried in five long paragraphs, the respondent apparently overlooked or disregarded three of them. The reply, incomplete and unfriendly, caused the distributer to lose the business and goodwill of a potential customer. Bad Example

Hi John,
I wanted to write you a quick note about Daniel, who's working in your department. He's a great asset, and I'd like to talk to you more about him when you have time. Best,
Skip
What is this email about? Well, we're not sure. First, if there are multiple Daniels in John's department, John won't know who Skip is talking about. Next, what is Daniel doing, specifically, that's so great? We don't know that either. It's so vague that John will definitely have to write back for more information. Last, what is the purpose of this email? Does Skip simply want to have an idle chat about Daniel, or is there some more specific goal here? There's no sense of purpose to this message, so it's a bit confusing. Good Example

Let's see how we could change this email to make it clear.
Hi John,
I wanted to write you a quick note about Daniel Kedar, who's working in your department. In recent weeks, he's helped the IT department through several pressing deadlines on his own time. We've got a tough upgrade project due to run over the next three months, and his knowledge and skills would prove invaluable. Could we please have his help with this work? I'd appreciate speaking with you about this. When is it best to call you to discuss this further? Best wishes,

Skip
This second message is much clearer, because the reader has the information he needs to take action. Checklist
Always Remember the five W’s : Who? What? When? Where? Why? While responding to a letter. Try to answer all questions, i.e. not only the stated question but also the implied question. Give extra information when desirable so that completeness of communication is not compromised. 2. Conciseness - Conciseness means wordiness, i.e. communicating what you want to convey in least possible words without forgoing the other C’s of communication. Conciseness is a necessity for effective communication. Concise communication is both time-saving as well as cost-saving....
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