Bmi Report

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BMI Practical

BMI, short for body mass index, is a test set out to decide if an individuals weight is ‘healthy’ for their height (NHS, 2012). An individuals BMI is calculated by using the following calculation: BMI = Weight (kg)

(Height (cm)/100) 2
BMI = Weight (kg)
(Height (cm)/100) 2

The health profession use BMI to calculate if someone is classed as being clinically “normal”, “obese” or “underweight”. It is believed that being underweight, or overweight, could lead to other health problems. Suggestions could be made to an individual to lose or gain weight depending on the result of their BMI. Typically the following is the boundaries for BMI: BMI < 18.5 = ‘underweight’

BMI is 18.5-25 = ‘normal’
BMI > 25 = ‘overweight’
BMI < 18.5 = ‘underweight’
BMI is 18.5-25 = ‘normal’
BMI > 25 = ‘overweight’

Overweight can be further categorized:
25-29.9 = ‘overweight’
30-39.9 = ‘obese’
40+ = ‘morbidly obese’
25-29.9 = ‘overweight’
30-39.9 = ‘obese’
40+ = ‘morbidly obese’

Common health problems associated with being overweight are heart disease, hypertension, diabetes (type 2), stroke, and kidney disease. On the other hand osteoporosis, anemia and amenorrhoea are common problems associated with being underweight. However being in the ‘normal’ bracket isn’t a necessarily sign of good health.

BMI is useful as it is quick, easy and cheap to perform. It doesn’t need any specialist equipment to measure it, and provides a generic scale that is used to compare large populations accurately. Consequently it is not without limitations, and using is as a ‘one size fits all’ means that an individual is put into a category that is not a true reflection of their state.

Table 1 – Showing data collected in class and calculated BMI Weight (kg)| Height (cm)| BMI|
66| 182| 19.9|
46| 172| 15.5|
81| 186| 23.4|
76| 167| 27.3|
65| 188| 18.4|
70| 169| 24.5|
86| 182| 26.0|
76| 180| 23.5|
61| 176| 19.7|
50| 160| 19.5|
64| 169| 22.4|
96| 180| 29.6|
74| 179| 23.1|
95| 179| 29.6|
55| 174| 18.2|
76| 169| 26.6|
59| 162| 22.5|
45| 157| 18.3|
63| 169| 22.1|
56| 169| 19.6|
91| 166| 33.0|
63| 185| 18.4|
62| 189| 17.4|
88| 186| 25.4|
68| 169| 23.8|
68| 178| 21.5|
53| 161| 20.4|
57| 168| 20.2|
58| 169| 20.3|
57| 166| 20.7|
49| 164| 18.2|
49| 168| 17.4|
75| 180| 23.1|

The average BMI for the set of data is 22.1
The average height for the group is 173cm
The average weight for the group is 67kg

The health survey for England found that in 2010 the mean BMI in men was 27.4 and in women was 27.1 (Hirani V, 2010). It also found that “Prevalence of overweight including obese varied by age, being lowest in the 16–24 age group, and higher in the older age groups among both men and women.” (The NHS Information Centre, Lifestyles Statistics, 2012). The group average at 22.1 was significantly lower than the average given for men and women in 2010 however as shown by the study age does have an effect on typical BMI. The average age for a second year university student would be around 20 years old which as shown by the study would fall in the group with the lowest average recorded BMI values. Another factor that has a slight difference in the average BMI recorded is sex, with females having a marginally smaller average BMI than males. So the composition of the group (amount of females and males) could have an impact on what the average should be around. The health survey in 2011 found that in 2011:

* The mean height for males was 175.3cm
* The mean height for females was 161.9cm
* The mean height for the general adult population was 168.4cm * The mean height for males aged 16-24 was 176.8cm
* The mean height for females aged 16-24 was 163.9cm
* The mean...
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