Asthma Outline

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Chronic Disease: Asthma Outline
Kyle S. Leister
SCI-162
08/12/2012
Dr. John Wallman

Chronic Disease: Asthma Outline
I. Introduction: Looking at Asthma and breaking it down to fully understand the chronic disease. II. Description of Asthma:
A. Meaning of Asthma
1. Asthma as a word means, “To breathe hard.” Just as the definition of the word, people with asthma have a hard time breathing, tightness in the chest and wheezing can occur. It is also a chronic disease of the respiratory system, which the respiratory passages in the lungs become oversensitive and overactive. (i)

B. Frequency of Asthma Occurrence
1. Nearly 25 million Americans suffer from asthma (over 8% of adults, over 9% of children), and 60% of asthma cases are “allergic-asthma.” The prevalence of asthma has been increasing since the early 1980s across all age, sex, and racial groups. (1)

2. females (8.1%) compared with males (6.2%)
3. The main reason females’ percentage is higher than males are that females’ body goes through so much changes that they tend to have respirttory problems.
C. Symptoms of Asthma
1. Physical
(A) Problems with breathing, shortness of breath, wheezing and more problems can show signs of physical symptoms of asthma.
(B) Decreased production of exercise and eating healthy food can lead to problems, which will affect the symptoms.
(C) Inability to receive adequate treatment for an asthma attack, you will eventually be unable to speak and will develop a bluish coloring around your lips. This color change, known as "cyanosis," means you have less and less oxygen in your blood. Without immediate aggressive treatment in an emergency room or intensive care unit, you may lose consciousness and eventually die.

2. Psychological
(A) Mental difficulties with Asthma are hard to deal with just like any other chronic disorder. Some mental issues will be depression, mood swings, anxiety and could be some more since it all depends on the individual.

(B) Emotional problems were associated with the quality of life of both the patients and their parents; behavioral problems had a smaller effect on the quality of life of the parents only. The authors proposed a structural model of the quality of life of adolescents with asthma and their parents in which quality of life is dependent on psychological variables and is responsible for emotional problems.(2)

3. Social
(A) Rates of asthma varied markedly with the child's sex; boys had twice the rate of asthma as girls. In addition, the factors associated with asthma varied with the child's sex. For boys, wheeze during infancy, early eczema, and parental asthma was all significant risk factors; for girls, the only risk factor was early eczema. Proportional hazards modeling of the data failed to show any significant associations between the development of asthma and a large range of other social and familial factors including breast-feeding, parental smoking habits, pets in the child's family, stress in the family, or family social background.(3)

(B) Work problems is associated with Occupational asthma, also called work-related asthma, is the most common occupational lung disease in the United States. It affects about 15% of adults with asthma, although estimates vary. It can cause wheezing, chest tightness, shortness of breath, and coughing. Symptoms may emerge hours after exposure to harmful substances or even months or years later. (4)

D. Causes of Asthma
1. Abnormal Chemistry
(a) Some foods will help with Asthma and decrease attacks. Here are the list of some foods that may help; coffee, oranges, nuts, carrots, onions, tuna, yogurts, leafy greens, and apples.
(b) Brain-deviled neurotrophic factor, a key mediator of neuronal plasticity, contributes to airway obstruction and hyperresponsiveness in a model of allergic asthma. BDNF is stored in human platelets and circulates in human plasma, but...
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