Assignment 205 Schools as Organisations

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Assignment 205 Schools as Organisations

Task A

The candidate is required to identify six different categories of school. For each category of school, the candidate should prepare brief notes about the way in which they are managed, the ages of children with which they deal and the curriculum they are required to follow.

Types of schools:
Independent schools
Academies
Voluntary schools
Foundation and trust schools
Community schools
Specialist schools

Independent schools: are set apart from the local education authority; they are funded by fees paid by parents and also income from investments, gifts and charitable endowments. They do not have to follow the National Curriculum and the Head Teacher and governors decide on the admission policy. They admit children from 3 up to college.

Academies: these are set up by sponsors from business and are independently managed schools which jointly fund the land and buildings. They have close links with the local education authority even though they are not maintained by it.

Voluntary schools: come under two types; voluntary aided and voluntary controlled.

Voluntary-aided schools will mainly be religious or faith schools. They are run by their own governing body in the same way as a foundation school. They are funded partly by governing body, partly by the charity and partly by the local education authority which also provides support and services. They follow the National Curriculum and admit children from 3 to 11.

Voluntary-controlled schools are similar types of schools to voluntary-aided schools, although they are run and funded by the local authority, which also employs the staff and provides support services. The land and buildings are usually owned by a charity, which is often a religious organisation. They admit children from 3 to 11 and follow the National Curriculum.

Foundation schools: are run by their own governing body which determines the admissions policy in consultation with the local education authority. The school is owned by the governing body or the charitable foundation. A trust school, although a type of foundation school, will form a charitable trust with an outside partner such as a business. The school will have to buy support services. The decision to become a trust school will be made by the governing body in consultation with parents.

Community schools: are run and owned by the local authority. Education and Library Board support the school making links with the local community, and by providing support and services; they also determine the admission policy. They admit children from 3 to 11 years and follow the National Curriculum.

Specialist schools: was a UK government initiative which encouraged secondary schools in England to specialise in certain areas of the curriculum to boost achievement. Currently there are nearly 3,000 specialist schools, or 88% of the state-funded secondary schools in England. The scheme was ended 2010 and funding was absorbed into general school budgets.

Assignment 205 Schools as organisations

Task B

1.Describe what each of the following do, using school with which the candidate is familiar as an example:

a)School governors

b)The head teacher

c)The senior management team

d)The special needs co-ordinator (SENCO)

e)Support staff

Responsibilities of the Governors

The school governors have responsibility for keeping under review standards of health and safety with the school. When deficiencies are identified the governors have responsibility for ensuring that corrective action is taken. The governors also have particular responsibility for:

Ensuring that decisions of the governing body take account of, and comply with, the health and safety policy of the Education Directorate.

Ensuring that sufficient resources are allocated to meet the mandatory minimum standards of the Education Directorate health and Safety Policy and legal requirements...
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