Are Entrepreneurs Born or Made

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It is not mandatory to be a "born entrepreneur" in order to succeed in business world (Klein, K). But, written by (Mathews, R et al) in the Academy of Entrepreneurs, it states that according to a study by Northeastern University’s School of Technological Entrepreneurship in 2006, it showed that “entrepreneurs are born, not made” (Taylor 2006). Thus it will be argued that entrepreneurs are neither born nor made, and rather that they can learn to have an entrepreneurial mind but, that it does help to be born with certain personality traits of an entrepreneur. The Business Dictionary defines entrepreneurs as; “someone who exercises initiative by organizing a venture to take benefit of an opportunity and, as the decision maker, decides what, how , and how much of a good or service will be produced.” There are certain characteristic traits seen in entrepreneurs that makes them different than an owner-manager, some of these can be achieved, while other traits come with birth. Entrepreneurs want to be independent and this gives them the inner drive for wanting high levels of achievement, which then results to believing that they can control their environment which ultimately means they can control their destiny. Since entrepreneurs believe they are in control of their own destiny, this makes them more than willing to take extreme levels of risks in order to seek opportunities that will then bring them to their ultimate goals which is profit and success. Self-motivation and innovation are the basic traits that entrepreneurs use in order to justify the risk that they take with their businesses (Piperopoulos, P: 136-142). The study that was held by Northeastern University’s School of Technological Entrepreneurship, surveyed more than 200 U.S. entrepreneurs and resulted that only 1 per cent believe that higher education is important in starting their own business, while a shocking 61 per cent said that their “innate drive” was more important, 21 per cent thought work...
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