Alternate Forms of Tourism

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 179
  • Published : March 20, 2013
Open Document
Text Preview
Kylie Toner THMT 2201 Alternate Forms of Tourism Mount Saint Vincent University
5/8/2009
Infusion Tourism

Table of Contents

Introduction2
Purpose of paper2
Concepts/definitions2
Sustainable tourism3

Background4
Niche Product4
International Efforts4
Product Potential8

Product Proposal8
Potential Products8
Marketing9
Strategy10
Secondary Market10

Challenges11

Conclusion12

References13

Introduction
The purpose of this research paper is to develop the concept of a niche tourism product that may be suitable for marketing in Nova Scotia. The research results presented in this paper are for the course THMT 2201 Alternate Forms of Tourism, at Mount Saint Vincent University. It is a requirement for course completion. Furthermore, this paper’s purpose is to increase student knowledge of niche tourism and the feasibility of its development. The niche product that will be discussed in this research paper is Infusion tourism, the various elements surrounding this concept internationally and locally, as well as whether it could be successful if developed in particular, in the city of Halifax and in the rural area of the Annapolis Valley. “Tourism is the world's largest industry. The number of tourists went from 25 million in 1950 up to 702 million in 2000. The tourism growth rate is 4% a year, and could reach 1 billion in 2010 and 1.6 billion in 2020 according to the World Tourism Organisation” (Eveil Network, 2005). In order to help put into perspective the concept of Infusion tourism, it is important to understand Niche tourism as well as its counter-point Mass tourism and how they impact the world. Mass tourism is large scale, traditional tourism that is often perceived as irresponsible tourism due to the reckless consumption of resources involved as well as the negative impacts it has environmentally and socio-culturally. Niche tourism on the other hand is a small specialised sector of tourism which appeals to a correspondingly tightly-defined market segment (special interest groups). It distinguishes and differentiates tourists based on their need for meaningful travel experiences that are unlike mass tourism experiences (Niche tourism lecture notes). It is often associated with sustainable tourism which is a term becoming increasingly important in the developing of tourism market products in the tourism industry because it is small scaled and less harmful than other forms of tourism. “For humans to live sustainably, the Earth's resources must be used at a rate at which they can be replenished. However, there is now clear scientific evidence that humanity is living unsustainably, and that an unprecedented collective effort is needed to return human use of natural resources to within sustainable limits” (Wikipedia: Sustainability) Tourists’ desire to travel with peace of mind that they are not destroying the possibility for future generations to enjoy the same things they are able to enjoy has significantly increased. Sustainability in itself is a fairly new yet complex term, dating back only to the late 20th century. It is the ability to maintain balance of a certain process or state in any system (in this case tourism). The concept of Infusion tourism relates to sustainable tourism on three different levels; economically, environmentally and socio-culturally. If this niche product were developed in Nova Scotia, it would be economically beneficial to the province due to higher product and tour sales. Through expansion, this niche product could increase employment opportunities in the agricultural sector, the food & beverage sector and in the tourism sector. On the environmental scale, infusion tourism would help stress the importance of rural harvesting to the wine industry of Nova Scotia as well as other local farmers. Socio-culturally, this niche product would further raise awareness of the importance of buying local and supporting local...
tracking img