ADAPTING LIFESTYLES TO CHANGING RAINFALL PATTERN IN KENYA

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ADAPTING LIFESTYLES TO CHANGING RAINFALL PATTERN IN KENYA
ABSTRACT
In the recent years, rain-dependent activities such as Agriculture in the tropical zone had been entirely dependent on the regular patterns and timing of the onset, amount and duration of the rains, people depended on their indigenous knowledge of these precipitation trends to predict the planting and harvesting seasons, nowadays, reliance on these native self-knowhow to plan agricultural activities and day to day chores has proven terribly mistaken; most studies has laid all the blame on climate change (global warming), a consistent erratic pattern and extremes in rainfall availability (floods and droughts) has interrupted all rain-fed activities in Kenya today. This paper attempts to diagnose the Changing Rainfall Patterns (CRP), the causes, the effects and more importantly, how to best adapt to its impacts on lifestyle of Kenyans. The main objective is to inform Kenyans on best adaptation measures to the CRP from an informed and reliable point of argument. Through a comprehensive desktop data review and analysis, the paper sought in-depth information from past reports, government documents, books, and journals which was aggregated to comprise a seamless, logical and comprehensive document on how Kenyans can adopt and embrace the situation and suit their lifestyles to the CRP. Chapter one highlights the main idea of the paper, i.e. it connects the topic of the paper to the purpose of the study while also considering the core objectives of this paper; the first chapter gives a global, regional, and a local dissection of the issue under scrutiny and then draws contemporary context of the study focus area. Chapter two is more of a literature review on the topic of the paper where works and researchers’ work on related topics and issues have been studied and referenced to give ground and base to this study, the third chapter is more of a discursive part which considers best way forward after reviewing what other researches have covered concerning the topic, it tries to present customized results of other studies that best suits the topic of this paper, the last chapter is a conclusionary and lays the final remarks and recommendations after consideration of the preceding chapters, the last part are appendices that could not be included in the body of the paper in spite of their rich relevant information. Key words; erratic, rainfall pattern, climate change, global warming Table of Contents

ABSTRACT 1
1.INTRODUCTION 3
2.MATERIALS AND METHODS 4
3.SYTHESIS OF AVAILABLE LITERATURE ON CHANGING RAINFALL PATTERNS 5 3.1.Evidence of changing rainfall trends 5
3.2.Kenya’s Vulnerability to changing rainfall patterns 8 4.DISCUSSION 13
4.1.Future projections in Climate (Rainfall) Trends; Adopted from (AAP, 2013) 13 4.2.Action and preparedness to changing rainfall should be now 15 4.3.Kenya’s response to Changing Rainfall Patterns (Climate Change) 17 5.CONCLUSION 18

1.INTRODUCTION
Rainfall pattern refers to the distribution of rain activities geographically, temporally, and seasonally. Normally, rainfall happens more in a particular time of the year than at other times of the same year. As a result, agricultural (rain-fed) have adopted these natural patterns of rainfall and farmers especially in the tropical region plan the planting-harvesting season depending on these rainfall patterns, essentially . Recent erratic changes in rainfall patterns which has been a consequence of climate change (global warming) has led to low agricultural output thus triggering food insecurity for an incessantly increasing population, other consequences include floods, droughts, famine majorly in the third world nations with low adaptation capabilities [1]. Large variability in rainfall with occurrence of extreme events such as 2004/2005 droughts, the El-Nino related floods of 1997/8, the lamina drought of 1999/2001 have been observed in East Africa [2], who also...
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