Intro to Comm Study Guide

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COMM 1 – Final Exam Review Guide – Winter 2012

Final exam: Tuesday, March 20, 8 – 11am, IV Theater 1

EXAM INFO

70-75 multiple choice questions (each Q worth 2 pts)

* Readings and Lectures covered; 10 - 15 Q’s from pre-midterm topics (lecture only), the rest are from post-midterm lectures and readings (textbook & reader)

Bring pink Parscore form and #2 pencil; sit in your TA’s section in the classroom (see slide when you come in)

STUDY HELP:

See “How Points Are Earned” handout in reader (p. 7) & Studying Tips and Test-Taking Tips below

See Practice Questions on GauchoSpace

Professor Mullin extended office hours: Thurs, Mar 15, 12:30 – 2pm AND 3 – 4:30pm, SSMS 4117

TA Q&A sessions (bring a question!):

Mon, Mar 19, 11am – 12pm in SSMS 1009

Mon, Mar 19, 1 – 2pm in SSMS 1009

Studying Tips

Spend time wisely! (e.g., re-typing your notes or making flashcards sounds at first like a good idea, but it takes a LONG time, and does it really get the info into your head? Think about WHAT REALLY WORKS…)

Study lecture notes first, then reinforce, fill in gaps, or add new info with the textbook/readings

Do not just memorize notes or definitions

Try to teach/explain concepts in your own words; use examples

Try to see connections and/or differences between ideas…

Test-Taking Tips

Pay attention to what you read in the question stem and the answer choices

Do not add info that is not there! Do not twist info into something it is not!

Ignore silly things, like how many “e” answers you have bubbled in a row

Think about what the question is asking, not about what you “know” about the topic

Do not look for some answer YOU have in your head, as it will not likely be there, and you’ll just end up picking something that sounds “kinda close” (but might well be wrong).

Instead: Read each answer that IS there and evaluate each one on its own merits! Each answer choice is either right or wrong for the given stem, so ask yourself if that answer would be correct if there were no other choices available.

In other words, do not just look for the “best” answer. Some answers may be more obviously correct than others, but there is no such thing a “more correct” answer. If it is correct, it is correct!

IF you find that two (or more) answers are both truly correct (whether or not one of them is more obvious), then there should be a choice that reflects that (e.g., “all of the above” or “a and b only”)!

GOOD LUCK!

See next page for highlights of the topics we’ve covered so far…

Highlights of Topics We’ve Covered So Far

PRE-MIDTERM TOPICS
Conceptualizing CommunicationCommunication Models Nonverbal Comm Interpersonal Comm Communication as a ScienceVerbal CommIntrapersonal Comm

POST-MIDTERM TOPICS

This is just a list of the main topics we talked about in lecture, and the readings that roughly go with those lecture topics. You can use this to help you organize your studying, but this is NOT a complete list of everything we’ve covered. Remember also that for LECTURE material, you need to know the details (inside & out, backwards & forwards!); for READINGS, you need to be able to pull out the key point(s) of each section (except where noted).

Intercultural Communication

Lecture (Prof. Howie Giles): Differences; dimensions (indiv/collectivism, hi/lo context, etc.); solutions (trad view

of contact/intercultural knowledge vs. understanding history, identity, outgroup biases, etc).

Reading: O&W Ch 3: Lec overlap; plus more dimensions of culture (uncertainty, power distance, etc.); social identity;

intercultural challenges (ethnocentrism, etc.)

Public Communication & Persuasion

Lecture: Source characteristics (credibility, effective delivery, etc.); message...
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