"Cochlea" Essays and Research Papers

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    What is Cochlear Damage? The cochlea is a tiny‚ snail-shaped structure. It is the main organ of hearing and is part of your inner ear. Cochlear Damage means that all or part of your inner ear has been hurt. Damage to the cochlea typically causes permanent hearing loss. This is called sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL). Many things can cause SNHL‚ or cochlear damage‚ including loud or extended noise exposure‚ certain powerful antibiotics‚ meningitis‚ Meniere’s disease‚ acoustic tumors‚ and even

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    Inner ear structure

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    labyrinth: Bony labyrinth is the rigid outer wall of the inner ear. It consists of three parts: vestibule‚ semicircular canals‚ and cochlea. These are cavities hollowed out of the substance of the bone‚ and lined by periosteum. They contain a clear fluid called "perilymph". The vestibule and semicircular canals are concerned with vestibular function (balance)‚ whereas the cochlea is concerned with hearing. Within the bony labyrinth is a membranous labyrinth (filled with endolymph)‚ which is also divided

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    Technical Description

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    hearing process (Figure 1): sound enters the ear (blue arrow)‚ travels down the auditory canal to the ear drum (green arrow)‚ transfers from the ear drum to the cochlea (or “inner ear”)‚ and is converted by the cochlea into electrical signals (red arrow) that pass through the Vestibular cochlear nerve to the brain (purple arrow). The cochlea transforms sound into electrical signals using tiny hearing hairs inside it. FIGURE 1 The natural hearing process. Image courtesy of howstuffworks.com

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    Sense Organs

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    SENSE ORGANS RECEPTORS (Sense organs) * Transducers of specific forms of kinetic energy * Change mechanical‚ electrical‚ thermal‚ chemical‚ or radiant energy into nerve impulses in sensory neurons Two major categories: * GENERAL RECEPTORS * Often exist as individual cells or receptor units * Widely distributed throughout the body * Most numerous such as: * touch‚ temperature‚ and pain: and * to initiate various reflexes necessary for maintaining

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    Auditory System

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    AUDITORY SYSTEM NOTES Questions 1. What is sound? 1. What are the physical dimensions of sound 2. What are the perceptual dimensions of sound 3. What sounds can humans hear? 2. What is the anatomy of the ear? 3. What are the brain structures and pathways involved in the perception of hearing? 4. How do we localize sounds? Why do we hear? * Communication iHelen Keller felt that being deaf was worse than being blind‚ because blindness isolated her from

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    Hearing Impaired

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    Hearing is one of the major senses and like vision is important for distant warning and communication. It can be used to alert‚ to communicate pleasure and fear. It is a conscious appreciation of vibration perceived as sound. In order to do this‚ the appropriate signal must reach the higher parts of the brain. Hearing impairment - A reduction in the ability to perceive sound; may range from slight inability to complete deafness HI- it is a distinction between deaf and hard of hearing. Deaf

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    Psychology Study Guide

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    PSYCH STUDY GUIDE Neonatal Reflexes: Babinsk: big toe lifts‚ other toes fan out Moro Reflex: arms fling out and grab something when child feels like he’s falling Palmer Grasp: touch a baby’s palms and his hand closes Planter Grasp Sucking- doesn’t need to learn how to breast feed Rooting Withdrawal – reaction to pain Vigotsky’s Theory Focuses more on cultural impact on human development Believed children actively seek to discover new principles (like Piaget) Zone of proximal

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    Cochlear Implants

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    Thirty-four years ago in October 1982‚ a Melbourne man‚ Graham Carrick‚ made history when a remarkable invention was implanted in his cochlea. It was “switched on” and fifteen minutes later he could hear for the first time in seventeen years. From that point on‚ nearly 200‚000 people worldwide and of all ages have benefited from life-changing cochlear implant technology (Humadro 46). Carrick has received backlash by the Deaf—people who embraces cultural norms‚ beliefs‚ and values of the Deaf Community—because

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    Cochlear Implants

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    to get affected by loss of hearing. The ear is divided into 3 parts (anatomically) as the Outer‚ Middle and Inner parts. “The cochlea is the auditory portion of the inner ear. Its core component is the Organ of Corti‚ the sensory organ of hearing‚ which is distributed along the partition separating fluid chambers in the coiled tapered tube of the cochlea. The cochlea is divided into three different chambers‚ each of which is receptive to different frequencies of sound “(Jarvis 2004). Cochlear

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    the years. A cochlear implant is an electronic medical device that replaces the function of the damaged inner ear. But unlike its counterpart hearing aids‚ which makes sound louder‚ cochlear implants do the work of damaged parts of the inner ear(cochlea) to provide sound signals to the brain. It all started with Alessandro Volta when he managed to stimulate his internal ear by using an electrical current the year 1800. Since that time there have been major modifications from the look and all the

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