"The Greek Way"

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“The Greek Way” by Edith Hamilton
Edith Hamilton. The Greek Way. New York: W.W. Norton & Company, Inc. 1930, 1942. Pp. 7-338.

The author of “The Greek Way”, Edith Hamilton was a pioneering female educator and writer on mythology. Edith attended college at Bryn Mawr in Pennsylvania. In 1895, she became the first woman to study at the University of Munich in Germany. Hamilton became the headmistress of Bryn Mawr Preparatory School for Girls in Baltimore, Maryland, in 1896 at the age of twenty-nine years old. After a remarkable twenty-six-year career, Hamilton retired from education in 1922. However, she did not stop working. She moved to New York City with her life partner, Doris Fielding Reid, and began a career writing scholarly articles on Greek drama and myths. Between 1930 and 1957, Hamilton published books and articles that to this day are considered defining analyses of ancient literature, culture, and life. Her writing took off with The Greek Way, written in 1930, which compared life in ancient Greece to that in modern Greece. Hamilton followed up by writing The Roman Way, which explored similar themes in Roman life. The Prophets of Israel, Three Greek Plays, Mythology, and The Golden Age of Greek Literature all marked the significant success of her prolific career. In her elder years, people around the world praised Hamilton for her groundbreaking role as a female academic. She was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Letters. Hamilton died in 1963 at the age of 95 in Washington, DC. Her rich life and her impressive body of written work still inspire students and academics alike.
In the academic works of the book “The Greek Way” by Edith Hamilton, the author provides information about Greek culture in an easy to understand but informational selection. In the first and second chapter it discusses the eastern and western parts of Greece as well as the belief in the mind and spirit.

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