Preview

Stage of Development | Physical Development | Cognitive Development | Social/Personality Development |

Satisfactory Essays
Open Document
Open Document
855 Words
Grammar
Grammar
Plagiarism
Plagiarism
Writing
Writing
Score
Score
Stage of Development | Physical Development | Cognitive Development | Social/Personality Development |
1. Changes from Adolescence to Adulthood CheckPoint
2. Parenting Styles and Development CheckPoint

3. The Sexual Response Cycle Stage of Development | Physical Development | Cognitive Development | Social/Personality Development | Adolescence | Growth spurts, for two to three years they will grow 8 to 12 inches | | | Young Adulthood | | | | Middle Adulthood | | | | Late Adulthood | | | | Physical, Cognitive, Social, and Personality Individuals experience many changes to the physical body, cognitive abilities, social development, and personality development throughout the various stages of life. This article looks at a few of the changes experienced during stages of development of the adolescent, young adulthood, middle adulthood, and late adulthood.

Adolescent Stages of Development
The physical changes during adolescence include growth spurts of eight to twelve inches in a period of two or three years, and puberty which heralds acne, voice changes, body hair growth, growth of internal and external reproductive organs (ovaries, breasts, penis, and testes), production of estrogen and progesterone increase, erection and ejaculation for males, and menarche and mature egg release for females. (Nevid & Rathus, 2005)
Cognitively, the adolescent is able to participate in abstract thinking, also referred to as the formal operational stage, enabling them to process and group ideas; adolescence also brings egocentrism in the form of imaginary audience (believing everything centers around one's appearance, thoughts, and behaviors) and personal fable (the belief that one is invincible and incapable of experiencing anything harmful). (Nevid & Rathus, 2005)
Social and personality development in adolescence is exemplified in the adolescent's search for independence which frequently results in conflict with anyone in authoritative positions and the engagement in risk-taking or reckless behaviors in part due to one's belief of

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • Good Essays

    Adolescent Interview Essay

    • 1284 Words
    • 6 Pages

    Teenage years can be a challenging time for many individuals. Beginning at the age of 11 through 20, adolescence is defined as a “transitional period in the human life span, linking childhood and adulthood” (Santrock 2009). At this point, the person is no longer a child, but not yet an adult. This makes it a very critical and sensitive time frame for identity formation.…

    • 1284 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Beautiful Brains

    • 761 Words
    • 4 Pages

    The brain is more adaptive during the period of adolescence due to the developing-mind between the years of 12 and 25. The brain has the least amount of growth during this phase, however it experiences vast reconstruction, absorbing everything that the synapses find useful to succeed in the life ahead. The brain begins to shape itself using the neurons extensively to make the mind more efficient for when adulthood comes. These traits acquired during adolescence stays with one even after maturation, leaving a permanent mark that is hard to change. The changes that the brain encounters begin to mold who they become, peers play a major role during this stage due to the reaction one has from the reward of success in taking risks as they adjust to life eventually making our world a better place.…

    • 761 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    CNDV 5311

    • 3583 Words
    • 12 Pages

    Developmental: A central task of adolescence is to develop a sense of oneself as an autonomous individual. The drive for such autonomy…

    • 3583 Words
    • 12 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Good Essays

    Adolesent Self-Portrait

    • 867 Words
    • 4 Pages

    Adolescence is a time to dramatic change, challenges, and growth, it is a miraculous that anyone survives. The experience of adolescence has not changed much until recently because of the access to technology. Prior to this adolescence was a predictable period of growth, a rite of passage for many young people.…

    • 867 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    P1 – Describe physical, intellectual, emotional and social development for each of the life stages…

    • 3000 Words
    • 12 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Psy 210 Appendix F Essay

    • 393 Words
    • 2 Pages

    | -Growth spurts, for two to three years they will grow 8 to 12 inches.-Secondary sex characteristics develops…

    • 393 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Good Essays

    As children continue to develop into the school years their view of themselves and others around them begins to change. During early childhood children are usually quite egocentric and often relate to the world around them through their own lens, as they do not easily think in hypothetical terms (Berger, 2008). This phenomenon was coined centration (Berger, 2008). Around the age of seven, early childhood egocentrism takes a shift. It is at this age when children begin to develop a more complex mind and can begin to think abstractly and hypothetically regarding events as well as the feelings and thoughts of others (Berger, 2008). The opinions of others do not affect young children nearly as much as they do seven to eleven year-olds. This is the age of judgment which children begin judging others, judging themselves, and contemplating how others are judging them (Berger, 2008). This phase can be extremely difficult for some children though it also can teach children to behave in a more socially conducive way (Berger, 2008). The complex social bonds and friendships often developed in middle childhood help pave the way for the further social and personal developments which will occur through adolescence (Berger, 2008). The mind of a teenager is much more complex their younger counterpart’s though it remain structurally similar (Artar, 2007). As early and middle childhood children have difficulty foreseeing the experiential view point of others, so do teenagers (Artar, 2007). Teenagers are quite concerned with how others perceive them so are younger children, though because the teenager can engage in formal operational thoughts, they are capable, and more likely, to be empathic toward others in general (Artar, 2007). When it comes to empathy, teenagers are most empathetic and understanding toward their parents and family members and less so toward their peers…

    • 565 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Chap4 HHS4U

    • 5334 Words
    • 42 Pages

    UNIT 2: LEAVING HOME Chapter 3: Early Adulthood Chapter 4: Becoming and Adult Chapter 5: Young Adult Issues and Trends CHAPTER 4: BECOMING AN ADULT  Overview  Developmental Theories Stage Progression Theories  Age-Linked Stages Theories  Constant Change Theories   Socialization Family  School   Preparing for an Occupation Family…

    • 5334 Words
    • 42 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Teenagers have the ability to make things clearly apparent and obvious in egocentrism through an imaginary audience that is watching every move that the teenagers are making. For example when a mother is with her teenage son, and they are exposed to the public and the mother tries to show her feelings and emotions to her son when he is surrounded…

    • 449 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Introduction: This chapter introduces the middle adulthood stages for an individual. During this stage of development there are a lot of changes that are taking place, physically and mentally for the individual. The ground for responsibility gets higher during this time and it might change to further their fields of work. Raising children and keeping healthy relationships in middle adulthood is shown greatly during this time.…

    • 550 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Better Essays

    “Describe the physical, intellectual, emotional and social development for each of the life stages of an individual.”…

    • 2287 Words
    • 10 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    When I was a child, I used to say anyone over the age of 30 was old. Then the harsh reality of getting older slapped me in the face while I was preparing to do this paper. The responsibility of finding the time to work on the paper, the kids nagging in the background and fighting over whose turn it is to play the PlayStation next and these are just little things that I have noticed in the first five minutes of typing this paper. I am going to share with the reader my perspective of early adulthood, middle aged adulthood, and I will also share my perspective of becoming an elderly citizen.…

    • 945 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    According to William Shultz psychobiography is when one takes historically significant lives and analysis them through psychological theories and research with the intention to undercover and understand their subconscious and conscious motives (Elms, 1994).…

    • 3991 Words
    • 16 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Good Essays

    Why Teenagers Act Crazy

    • 711 Words
    • 2 Pages

    Adolescence is usually seen in our society as a period of emotional drama and troublemaking teenagers, there is a psychological explanation for this.…

    • 711 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    The ages between 18 and 30 are considered early adulthood. Intimacy, career ambitions, knowledge empowerment, and wealth are jus but a few things that drive most people in this age group (Broderick & Blewitt). As one grows, so does their status, they became choosy and selective on where and who to hand out with, who to date and in most cases their lifestyles completely change.…

    • 579 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays