Salem Witch Trials: The Salem Witch Trials

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The Salem Witch trials were started in 1692. But why? According to History.com, a group of girls claimed to be possessed with the devil and that they were practicing witchcraft. This event may have caused the trials to begin. These girls were from Salem Village, which is how the “Salem Witch Trials” got their name. Many doctors in the village were diagnosing children with bewitchment starting earlier that year. These practices did not go on for long, but were very devastating.

Multiple cases were filed after the 9-year old Elizabeth and 11-year old Abigail were diagnosed. The behavior consisted of uncontrollable fits and screaming. After the community found out about the first diagnosis, everyone was afraid of the people and their family because they thought they would catch whatever they had. Not much later, the first witch was hung. Her name was Bridget Bishop. She was hung in June, 8-days after she was convicted. But she was just the beginning of it all. After Bridget, 24 other men, women and children were accused.

According to the little girls that allegedly started it all, a servant began telling the stories of demons and folklore to the children of the small town, which caused the girls to spread rumors about the events. Along with the rumors, a strong belief in the devil was beginning to form. People around the
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Because of a servant telling the children of the town of sorcery and the devil, they began to believe what they had heard. The town was scared of the “possessed” people, thinking that killing them would stop the problem. Sadly, over 24 men, women and children died because they were assumed to have possessed by the devil. Bridget Bishop was the first accused and was hung on June 10, 1692. Many followed, until the court overruled the judgement of the mayor. As you can see, there are many reasons that is where the stories

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