What Caused The Salem Witch Trials Hysteria Of 1692?

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What caused the Salem Witch Trials Hysteria of 1692?

In 1692, an event called the Salem Witch Trials occurred, because of this, the people from a village called Salem, Massachusetts were fearful because they could be accused a witch. This all started when a group of young girls began to act very strange. The behaviors of the girls’ ranged from, screaming, copying body movements, pain, falling on the floor, twitching, and many other symptoms.

This hysteria might’ve been caused by the power struggle in this community, according to Document C, the village of Salem had more accused people than actual accusers. This means that, in order to gain fame and power, the people in Salem wanted to accuse people of being witches because if you accused

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