Witchcraft And History: The Salem Witch Trials

Satisfactory Essays
The belief in witchcraft, or supernatural actions and the devil’s ability to give certain humans the power to harm others, in return for their loyalty, had been a part of traditional village culture in Europe since the 14th century. (history.com) The Salem witch trials took place between 1692 and 1693 in colonial Massachusetts. Two hundred people were accused of witchcraft and twenty people were executed. (smithsonianmag.com) People were hanged, pressed to death, and imprisoned.

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • Good Essays

    The Salem Witch Trials started in 1692 in Salem Village, Massachusetts, and are believed to have been created by many different theories. No one actually knows why or how the witchcraft started in the early colony. The witches were girls of all ages who were caught having strange behavior. Many people started believing they were actual witches because of the way people claimed to have been hurt or affected by a witch. Some Puritans would act out to make it seem like a witch was harming them or causing them to do things just to receive attention. The girls were often killed or forced to admit to being a witch. 200 of the girls were accused of taking place in witchcraft and 19 were sentenced to death by hanging.…

    • 561 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Some of the earliest accusation of witchcraft can be dated back to 1484 in Germany. Many men and women were persecuted, tortured, burnt and even killed because they were believed to be witches under the devil’s control. In this essay I will talk about what witchcraft was, who was accused of practicing it, the social response in Salem and what social and religious factors are given to account for the harsh response to witchcraft.…

    • 776 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    The Salem Witch Trials of 1690s was an extremely dark time in American history. More than 200 people were accused of practicing witchcraft and 20 were killed during the hysteria. The events that led to this hysteria caused the people of Salem to be deeply affected by this terrible time in our history. With that in mind, the outcome of these trials caused people to be killed even if they were innocent. Historians believe that this time in our history was immensely unfair and no one had a fair trial.…

    • 272 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    The Salem Witch Trial

    • 57 Words
    • 1 Page

    The Salem Witch Trial is a famous episode in US colonial history that resulted in the conviction and execution of people accused of witchcraft in 1692 in Massachusetts . Generally analyzed as stemming from a period of infighting and puritanical paranoia , this trial results in the execution of twenty-five people and the imprisonment of many…

    • 57 Words
    • 1 Page
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Good Essays

    Many villages, in the late 1600’s, were undergoing what we know today as with trials. The most famous one that sparked people’s interest was the one that took place in the village of Salem, Massachusetts. It all started with a group of girls blaming one girl in particular as being a “witch” and from that a ripple effect occurred. During this time the girls who were accused of being a witch held a certain stereotype. This stereotype included being very old and very poor. If someone was found guilty if witch crafted at this time, they were given a trail. The punishment for being found guilty of witchery was truly horrific. Examples of these punishments included: stoned to death, hung, or burned on a stake. The women found guilty were not only…

    • 947 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    The Salem Witch Trials was a historic event that occurred in Salem, Massachusetts in the year 1692 and lasted until 1693. It’s known to be a dark time in American History (Brooks, Historyof Massachusetts.org). It first began when a group of teenage girls were exposed of practicing witchcraft and it then lead to bigger things Innocent people were killed and others were treated poorly. More than 200 individuals were wrongfully blamed and 20 were executed for denying the accusations (Blumberg, Smithsonianmag.com ). To this day no one is sure as to why the trials even started. There are numerous theories that state the causes of the infamous witch hunt but only a few of them are quite convincing. Many historians believe that religion is the main…

    • 839 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    Act Three Questions Directions On a separate sheet of paper, please answer each part of each question asked below. Please use complete sentences and please answer the question as asked. 1. As the act opens, who is being interrogated and on what charge Martha Corey is being interrogated by Judge Hathorne on the charge of telling fortunes (witchery). 2. What is interesting about the dialogue at the beginning of this act What was Miller trying to suggest about the tone of the legal proceedings to follow This indirect dialogue (off stage / only heard, not seen) suggests that although people will talk / be heard, the truth will not be seen / acknowledged. 3. What is Mary Warren now prepared to tell the court Mary Warren is prepared to the court that the girls have only been sporting, or pretending. They honestly have never seen or known a witch and theyve only lied to protect themselves by throwing suspicion on others. 4. What two facts about John Proctor does Ezekiel Cheever feel compelled to reveal to Danforth Ezekiel Cheever feels compelled to tell Deputy Governor Danforth that John tore up the arrest warrant for Elizabeth when Cheever served it and that Proctor sometimes plows on Sunday. 5. What compromise, or deal, does Danforth offer to Proctor What is Proctors response Why does he respond this way Because Elizabeth claims that she is pregnant, Danforth offers to not try her until after shes delivered her child if Proctor will drop the charge against the court that the proceedings have been unjust. Proctor said that he could not accept that plea because his friends wives, who are also innocent, have been charged and they need to be freed. He feels that the truth needs to come out to protect all of the innocent people. 6. How do Hathorne and Parris persuade Danforth to respond to the deposition that lists ninety-one supporters of Rebecca, Elizabeth, and Martha Corey Hathorne and Parris persuade Danforth that all of the ninety-one supporters must be…

    • 1850 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    Throughout history there have been thousands of “false” trials. These trials were based around false accusations. The trials most notable for accusations without the clearest of evidence was the Salem witch trials, hundreds were killed for being suspicious and never indicating that they were actual witches. Everyone who died in Salem and everyone who is serving or served an undeserved sentence have or at least had families, career opportunities, a career, in short a life. All of these get ripped away from people even after the person accusing them has admitted to being a liar after the innocent has served time or, a portion of his/her sentence. The acts of a false charge is not as well recognized of a felony, and should be treated much more severely.…

    • 590 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Salem Witch Trials

    • 1175 Words
    • 3 Pages

    In my depiction, the events of the Salem Witch Trials were most responsible by Abigail Williams. In Arthur Miller’s play, Abigail demonstrated her malevolent ways by showing her lustful and violent characteristics, along with her personal vendetta against Elizabeth Proctor. These character flaws, in my opinion, were the driving force that started the events in Salem, Massachusetts. Her hatred for Elizabeth, and wanting her dead, was the reasoning behind her drinking a blood charm in the forest, which was witchcraft. Her lust for John Proctor completely denied good Christian values, and her violent threats to the girls involved in the woods showed that she obviously had something to hide. In this document, I will prove her flawed actions with quotes from the story, and in-depth detail of how these actions contributed to the trials.…

    • 1175 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    In Salem during the year 1962, nineteen people were executed due to witchcraft. During this period, 188 people were accused of practicing witchcraft. Out of these 188 people, 59 were tried, 31 of them were convicted and nineteen of the 31 that were convicted were then all hung at Gallows Hill. In the seventeenth century it was normal procedures to have people corrected or even execute people who were a threat to the town of Salem because everyone thought it was okay to have people corrected for their wrong behaviour and to a point that their punishment could have been an execution. Were the ways to prove that the accused witches were innocent really accurate? They had five different ways to prove they were innocent. They had to recite a prayer, get checked for any marks on their bodies and the last three ways were to get a testimony of the accused witches, a confession or any evidence.…

    • 812 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    In The Crucible Miller demonstrates the evils within the human nature through the experience of the Salem Witch Trials. Many characters in this play endure their own personal crucibles. First, Elizabeth Proctor has the ignominy of keeping a terrible secret. Also, Giles Corey goes through a deadly trial trying to protect his neighbor. Finally, Mary Warren, a shy and timid girl, has the impossible task of going against Abigail and the court. Each of these characters’ crucibles are very excruciating, but only some pass while others fail.…

    • 576 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    The witch Trials

    • 1310 Words
    • 6 Pages

    There is little symbolism within The Crucible, but, in its entirety, the play can be seen as symbolic of the paranoia about communism that pervaded America in the 1950s. Several parallels exist between the House Un-American Activities Committee’s rooting out of suspected communists during this time and the seventeenth-century witch-hunt that Miller depicts in The Crucible, including the narrow-mindedness, excessive zeal, and disregard for the individuals that characterize the government’s effort to stamp out a perceived social ill. Further, as with the alleged witches of Salem, suspected Communists were encouraged to confess their crimes and to “name names,” identifying others sympathetic to their radical cause. Some have criticized Miller for oversimplifying matters, in that while there were (as far as we know) no actual witches in Salem, there were certainly Communists in 1950s America. However, one can argue that Miller’s concern in The Crucible is not with whether the accused actually are witches, but rather with the unwillingness of the court officials to believe that they are not. In light of McCarthyist excesses, which wronged many innocents, this parallel was felt strongly in Miller’s own time.…

    • 1310 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    In this research paper, I plan to discuss how people believed that witches completely disregard the logical side of it. Like how they tied weights to people and throw them into a lake to see if they would sink or float. The whole idea that people would ignore logic and intellectualism and instead of believing in fictional things.…

    • 180 Words
    • 1 Page
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    The Salem Witch Trials the most well known Witch Hunt in the 1600’s. The mass hysteria corrupted the town of Salem when girls were caught dancing in the forest and was not an exception in a town of strong religion and superstition. As many were accused and confessed of something they have not done. Elizabeth Proctor was very virtuous and independent when it came to accusing and being accused. Proctor did not fall into the mass Hysteria of the society of Salem.…

    • 116 Words
    • 1 Page
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Good Essays

    Salem Witch Trials

    • 1763 Words
    • 8 Pages

    Some people say that the Salem Witch Trials were less a religious persecution than economic in purpose, using religion as a guise to gain property. I believe that the Salem witch trials were less a religious persecution than economical. I believe this for several reasons; one being that the accused witches were using their witchcraft on other people in the town and it was affecting them. Many people were accused of performing witchcraft and were persecuted for doing so. But I believe that people in towns accused others of "witchcraft" whenever something went wrong, because "witchcraft" was such a common thing back than. When the witches that were accused of this so called witchcraft, usually the rest of their family, if they had one, would have to sell their house and this gave the people in the town more land and gave other people outside of the town to move into the town. Since there were two distinct parts to Salem, it is believed that the rich people of Salem accused the poorer people so they could take over their land.…

    • 1763 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Good Essays