Professor Interview

Satisfactory Essays
Andrew Garcia
Freshman Seminar
November 11, 2010
Thursday 12:10

Professor Interview

The professor I decided to interview is my biology teacher Kane-Barnese because I am a biology major and wanted to learn more from a once Concordia student that graduated with a degree in biology. She is a new teacher that seemed a little nervous at first but now she has become a good teacher and I look forward to going to her biology class every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday from 8:30am to 9:20am. She is also my biology lab teacher, that is my favorite class because we get to do hands on stuff like finding the osmolarity of potatoes, cellular respiration fermentation and bean seeding oxygen consumption.

Before she came to teach at Concordia University this year she was a TA at the University of California, Los Angeles. She has always loved science, so she decided to teach something she loved to students that were just as fascinated about science as she is. She gets enjoyment out of teaching and although it can be stressful she feels she can continue teaching here at Concordia University for a long time. While she was in college she did research on a protein found in the disease Lou Gehrig’s disease that was used for her dissertation. Lou Gehrig’s disease is a form of motor neuron disease. ALS is a progressive, fatal, neurodegenerative disease caused by the degeneration of motor neurons, the nerve cells in the central nervous system that control voluntary muscle movement. The condition is often called Lou Gehrig's disease in North America, after the famous New York Yankees baseball player who was diagnosed with the disease in 1939. Kane- Barnese did research on the protein APC that slows disease progression and extends survival. Therefore it is suggested that strategies designed to activate APC might be of benefit to patients with inherited, and possibly sporadic, ALS. She also helped isolate and characterize copper-zinc superoxide dismutase. Copper-zinc

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