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Justified True Belief

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Justified True Belief
The justified true belief theory of knowledge is an idea that if you have evidence to justify your belief then your justification makes that belief true. Your evidence holds true because of your previous experiences or your five senses thus making your idea true when you can rule out other alternative evidence. This theory is broken down into three necessary conditions: truth, belief and justification. Truth is the condition where it accurately represents the world; belief is when you believe something is true; justification is when you have a good reason to believe something. When you have all of these three necessary conditions put together, then it becomes sufficient to prove what you believe is true; however, gettier cases prove this to be false. A gettier case is a counterexample to the justified true belief theory because it argues if the necessary conditions are true. Gettier cases uses examples to prove that the evidence to your idea is false and if your evidence is false, then you don’t actually know what you knew. In my gettier case I will use the example of person B inviting her friend, person C, over to her house for dinner. When person C arrives at B’s house, C enters the house because B left the door open for him while she was busy in the kitchen cooking. When B walks out into the living room to greet C, she finds him completely soaked and drenched in water sitting on her couch. Because C is wet from head to toe, B believes that it is raining outside. She is justified in believing that it is raining outside because C is doused in water. B believes that it is raining outside based on C’s appearance and she has good reason to believe it is raining because he comes into her home soaked. However, it is raining really hard outside but that is not the reason why C is drenched. On his way here, he was chased by B’s neighbor’s pit-bull, causing him to throw his umbrella into the air and jump into B’s pool as a getaway which led him to be soaked from top

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