Great Awakening Dbq

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Question No. 13 Answer:
The Great Awakening was a mass movement in the historical backdrop of the western world that occurred around the middle of the eighteenth century. This movement fixated on religion and individual confidence of individuals belonging to every socioeconomic class. There are numerous who feel that it was a reaction to the reasoning that created as an aftereffect of Enlightenment and an endeavor to turn individuals' attention back to church and god. Essential religious leaders including Jonathan Edwards had an inclination that individuals were going far from religion as it was dry and seemed far off from the general population. These compelling leaders attempted to underline upon individual religious experience while in
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Great Awakening was when individuals woke up to the need of religion in their lives, and it held onto the oppressed, for example, agriculturists, the blacks and the slaves. On the other hand, Enlightenment stayed in the savvy people's hands and the researchers. In spite of the fact that the Great Awakening was a reaction against the Enlightenment and John Winthrop's concept of a city on a hill; yet it was likewise a long term reason for the Revolution. Some time recently, pastors spoke to a high society of sorts. Awakening priests were not generally appointed, separating appreciation for betters. The new religions that developed were a great deal more democratic in their methodology. The general message was one of greater fairness. The Great Awakening was likewise a national event. It was the first real occasion that every one of the colonies could share, serving to separate contrasts between them. There was no such scene in England, further highlighting changes in the middle of Americans and their cousins over the ocean. In fact this religious change had stamped political

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