The Second Great Awakening

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The Second Great Awakening was a time period in the early 19th century where people became extremely religious. It reflected cultural romanticism described by enthusiasm, emotion, and an appeal to religion. Religion had a major role through out this time period. There were huge religious gatherings and revivals that attracted millions of people and it caused many different social changes. The Second Great Awakening created many different movements that involved religion, abolitionists, and women’s rights.
The Second Great Awakening was a Christian revival movement during the 19th century. The movement began around 1800, and it began to gain momentum by 1820. The Second Great Awakening was a time by which every person could be saved through
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There would be meetings that would inform the people of the conditions the slaves had to live in and explained why slavery is a horrific thing. Theodore Weld tells the story of the life of a slave man, he describes the way we treat slaves as “barbarous inhumanity” (Doc. E). Weld informs the people that the slaves are overworked, underfed, improperly clothed and lodged, and have an insufficient amount of sleep. These men are also forced to wear iron pronged collars, have weights tied to their feet, and yokes were strapped to them. Some of the men even had their front teeth torn out so that they can be easily recognized if they run away (Doc. E). African American Minister, Henry Highland Garnet said in his “Address to the Slaves of the United States” that slavery is a sin and if you continue to practice it then you will "meet with the displeasure of the Almighty” (Doc. F). Garnet tells the people to bring up your children teaching them to obey and respect his laws and worship no other God but him.
The Women’s Rights Movement was sparked during the Second Great Awakening. The Second Great Awakening created a behavior for reform in American society. It focused on the idea that society could and should be perfect. Woman in this time were expected to cook, clean, and take care of the children, Angelina Grimke describes this role as the “woman sphere” (Doc. G). Grimke believed that woman could do

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