George Elwell The Problem Of Evil

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The Problem of Evil

To present the topic of “the problem with evil,” without acknowledging there is a God can be confusing. I think one of the best questions that you could ask is, why does God allow evil being a perfect and loving God (Elwell, pg 413 There are different types of evil that are allowed in this world. The first is moral evil, which began in the garden of Eden when Eve ate the fruit off the tree and deliberately disobeyed God in an act of sin and evil (Gen. 3)(Elwell, pg 412). The next is natural evil; this is explained mainly in natural disasters such as, earthquakes, hurricanes, tornadoes, and disease. Elwell writes, “natural evil is the consequence of moral evil,” then goes onto explain that natural evil is not distinct
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. . therefore through their act of disobedience Adam and Eve sin entered the world, and because of this we were and are all born sinners (Elwell, pg 434). There are many reasons why we suffer here on earth. First mentioned by Elwell is a quote from Job 4:7-9 where God will use pain and affliction as a means of judgment (pg 883) Second, the Bible teaches that sometimes pain and affliction will help people turn back to God, or bring a person to salvation (Israel in the tribulation Zech 12 (pg 883). Lastly, Elwell says that sometimes it will be by means of punishment or chastisement and used Psalm 94:12-13, and also Hebrews 12:6 (Elwell, pg …show more content…
The problem with the free will theodicy is that not all theologies are consistent or hold identical positions (Elwell, pg 1184). Elwell also states, that the “free will defense is an inappropriate answer to the problem of moral evil, since the notion of freedom involved in the free will defense is incompatible with the freedom involved in the Calvinistic system (Elwell, pg 1184).” Elwell writes about another theodicy which is the soul building theodicy, this theodicy rests upon a rationalist theology (Elwell, pg 1186) John Hick asks a good question by saying, “What sort of environment would be most conducive to soul-building?” I feel that would be good reason for sin to be present in everyday life, which allows God to show His mercy and grace. Elwell also writes about the fact of having an Edenic paradise would currently take away from a world to win souls to Christ. With Hick’s theology on the subject, Elwell notes that this would not be accepted by some as a whole due to the way it is outlined (Elwell, pg 1186). The intent of a consistent theodicy is to avoid self-contradiction (Elwell, pg 1187). For example, if you write a theodicy explaining evil and try to justify it by

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