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Natural Law and Right Moral Action

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Natural Law and Right Moral Action
A) Outline Augustine’s Theodicy.
Augustine’s theodicy is mostly influenced by the creation stories found in the Genesis. Augustine had a traditional view of God and thought God was omnipotent and good. The genesis mentions that everything God made was good, therefore the universe that God created is good. Augustine believed there were higher and lower goods but everything was good in its own way.
Augustine called evil the privation of good and not a substance. It comes from the sins that Adam and Eve had done in the Garden of Eden. In Genesis 3 Adam and Eve were enticed to take the fruit off the tree of knowledge because Satan said so, even though God said not to go anywhere near it, it was up to them to make their free decision. Therefore Augustine believed God saw humanities misuse of free will and therefore planned that the people who abuse the use of free will can go to hell however those who use free will wisely will be saved and go to heaven. However Augustine’s idea of privation does not apply when you lac something you should have. For example if you can’t walk you lack the health you should have. Augustine believed God didn’t create evil but it came about when the angels and humans tuned their back on the higher good and settled for the lower good because of their free choices used with free will. Augustine believed the sin of Adam was passed on though all humans and was called the original sin, moreover Augustine believed God sent Jesus down to die for our sins instead of sending everyone to hell.
Natural evil came from the loss of order in nature, moral evil came from the knowledge of good and evil that humanity had discovered through disobedience because they choose the lesser good. Those who follow God will live an eternal life however those who reject God would suffer eternal torment.
Augustine describes devils as fallen angles who chose to turn away from God. This brought disharmony into the creation and it is the actions of the devils

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    Augustines's theodicy, which aims to decipher why there is evil in the world, is greatly influenced by the Bible’s creation stories, Genesis 1-3, which he took literally. Augustine believed, that God had made the world ex nihilo (out of nothing) and when making the world he had made it free from flaws. He believed very strongly that God is good, omnipotent and omniscience.

As he had a traditional view of God it created a problem that he had to solve, if God is good and he is omnipotent and He created the world, why is there evil in it? He solves this problem by saying that God is responsible for the evil in the world by defining evil as “privation.” What this means is that when we use worlds such as "evil" and "bad" we are saying that something does not meet our expectations of what it should be like (by nature). Augustine wrote that evil is not a substance but is in fact an absence of kind feelings. If you say that a human being is evil, you are saying that the way that they behave does not match expectations of how a human being should behave. For example, if you are mean, you lack the qualities of generosity and charity. This is a privation in Augustines thinking. It is the failure to be what you should be that is wrong.

Augustine also said that God can't be blamed for creating evil himself that occurs in the world. He believes that God created a good, perfect world which was in harmony (existing in a state of peace and happiness with each other) at the beginning. Augustine said that evil comes from angels and human beings. Adam and Eve are tempted by the serpent and uses their free will to choose to do what they are told not to do. They choose not to be in harmony with God - this is called Original Sin. Once disharmony is introduced the original peaceful state of the Garden of Eden cannot be restored.
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