"Utilitarian Theory With Enron" Essays and Research Papers

  • Utilitarian Theory With Enron

    Explanation of the Utilitarian Ethical Theory There are many different ethical approaches that deal with the morality issues we face every day, but the utilitarian approach holds the feeling of morally belonging to a group and the lack of individualism that many others carry. It also can be a very cold approach for those who belong to the minority in a society. This is because the principle of utility says that “we ought to do that which produces the greatest amount of happiness or pleasure for...

    Ethics, Henry Sidgwick, Intrinsic value 1402  Words | 4  Pages

  • The Utilitarian Theory of Punishment

    Philosophy 338 Professor Hubin THE UTILITARIAN THEORY OF PUNISHMENT I. Utilitarian Theories of Punishment: Utilitarian justifications are forward-looking (consequentialistic) in nature. All of the questions about the justification of punishment (general justification, title and severity) will be answered by appeal to the utility (value) of the consequences of an action. A. The General Justification: All punishment is, according to the utilitarian, intrinsically bad, because it involves the...

    Crime, Criminal justice, Criminal law 1547  Words | 6  Pages

  • Kantian and Utilitarian Theories

    Kantian and Utilitarian Theories Kantian and Utilitarian Theories Applying philosophical concepts to social issues can test the relevance of philosophy in contemporary society. Such application may also help to resolve present-day social issues, as philosophy can draw light on moral concerns. In this paper, the Kantian and Utilitarian moral theories are applied to the Nestle advertising controversy which began in 1970, and which lingers...

    Breastfeeding, Categorical imperative, Ethics 2409  Words | 7  Pages

  • Compare Utilitarian and Deontological Theory

    COMPARE UTILITARIAN AND DEONTOLOGICAL THEORIES Utilitarianism is the idea that the moral worth of an action is determined by its usefulness. In maximizing utility and minimizing negative utility, in short it can be defined as pleasure minus pain. Deontology means duty or obligation. This theory was founded by a German philosopher, Immanuel Kant (1724-1804). According to Kant, it is the only way of making moral decisions. Another definition for deontology is that it is an approach to the...

    Deontological ethics, Empiricism, Ethics 1830  Words | 6  Pages

  • The Utilitarian

    | The Utilitarian, Libertarian and Rawlsian approach to Nestlé’s Ice Mountain Water | Justice Case Study Paper | | Rochelle Carlisle | 1/31/2013 | | Many people believe that water is just nothing, which in a way they are somewhat correct. Have you ever looked at the label on bottled water? What do you see or better yet what don't you see. You don't see numbers on the nutritional facts of bottled water because water is just that nothing, or is it? Water makes up about 70 percent...

    Great Lakes, John Rawls, Justice 1097  Words | 3  Pages

  • Utilitarian Theory & Human Rights

    Utilitarian Theory and Human Rights Utilitarianism can be defined as a moral theory by which the public welfare of a community is dependent on the “sum welfare of individuals, which is measured in units of pleasure and/or pain”, requiring governments to make decisions based on the “largest sum of pleasure” (Postema, 2006). However Bentham argued that "every individual in the country tells for one, no individual for more than one", meaning that the weight of an individual’s happiness should always...

    Amnesty International, Democracy, European Convention on Human Rights 1610  Words | 5  Pages

  • Enron

    Under the common law, accountants may be found liable to the clients who hire them under several legal theories, including breach of contract, fraud, and negligence. Accountants owe a duty to use reasonable care, knowledge, skill, and judgment when providing auditing and other accounting services to a client. In other words, an accountant’s actions are measured against those of a “reasonable accountant” in similar circumstances. The development of GAAPs, GAASs, and other uniform accounting standards...

    Balance sheet, Common law, Contract 1272  Words | 4  Pages

  • Is the 'Philosophy of Swine' Objection a Telling Criticism of Utilitarian Theory?

    telling criticism of Utilitarian theory? Why or why not?” Philosophy of swine. This was mentioned by Mill criticizing Bentham’s utilitarianism. Before looking at Mill’s criticism, historical background of the birth of utilitarianism should be discussed ahead. Utilitarianism arose in the Industrial Revolution period. As nations became industrialized in the eighteenth century, bourgeois: an industrial middle class, appeared demanding new political and economic theory which would support their...

    Jeremy Bentham, John Locke, John Rawls 1297  Words | 4  Pages

  • Afirmative action in workplace: discussing with Kantian and Utilitarian theories

    paper is to highlight the concept of affirmative action in the workplace, and explain why one person of gender or race would be hired over another more qualified for the position just to fulfill hiring requirements, while using Kantian and Utilitarian ethical theories to justify each side of the issue. Affirmative action policies can be described as any policies that attempt to actively dismantle institutionalized or informal cultural norms and systems of inscriptive group-based disadvantages, and the...

    Affirmative action, Black people, Discrimination 941  Words | 3  Pages

  • Enron

    ENRON Principles of Accounting Enron Key Players KENNETH LAY Former Enron chairman JEFFREY SKILLING Former Enron CEO DAVID DUNCAN Former Andersen partner NANCY TEMPLE Andersen lawyer THOMAS WHITE Secretary of the Army SHERRON WATKINS Enron vice president Enron started about 29 years ago in July 1985 in Houston, Texas.. A energy economist named Kenneth Lay became the CEO of Enron. Mr. Lay was a very optimistic ...

    Accounting scandals, Arthur Andersen, Creative accounting 976  Words | 4  Pages

  • Enron

    The Illusion That Took the World by Surprise Enron: The Smartest Guys In the Room is a movie about Enron and how it fooled the world into believing it was one of the most stable and profitable companies in the U.S. This is very sad because many people believed in the figures Enron was producing and entrusted their life saving in Enron stock. The scandal didn’t just affect a small group of people but 10’s of thousands of people lost everything, due to an illusion. Kenneth Lay earning a Ph...

    Accounting scandals, Andrew Fastow, Enron 1646  Words | 5  Pages

  • Enron

    Temuujin Enkhbold Enron Fraud Once the seventh largest company in America, Enron was formed in 1985 when InterNorth acquired Houston Natural Gas. The company branched into many non-energy-related fields over the next several years, including such areas as Internet bandwidth, risk management, and weather derivatives (a type of weather insurance for seasonal businesses). The Enron fraud case is extremely complex. Some say Enron's demise is rooted in the fact that in 1992, Jeff Skilling, then president...

    Accounting scandals, Corporate crime, Enron 1062  Words | 3  Pages

  • enron

    “A white paper is a government report outlining policy or authoritative report on a major issue. White papers discuss a specific business issue, product, or competitive situation.” The Aftermath Affects On December 2, 2001, Enron filled for bankruptcy under chapter 11 of the US banking code. This sudden collapse of one of Fortune 500 largest companies shocked the world. Once the world’s largest energy company, Enron’s scandal became the largest bankruptcy recognition and was attributed as...

    Board of directors, Business ethics, Corporate governance 717  Words | 3  Pages

  • Enron

    The Enron Kaiwing Ho Ethics, Governance & Accountability BU.135.301.U2.FA12 Professor Crain November 21, 2012 Enron Since Enron Corporation has been bankrupt there were 20,000 employees lost their jobs, medical insurance and average severance pay was only $4500. However, the top executives were paid bonuses totaling $55 million. In 2001, employees lost $1.2 billion in retirement funds and retirees lost $2 billion in pension funds. Yet, Enron’s top executives cashed in $116 million...

    Board of directors, Corporate governance, Enron 1536  Words | 5  Pages

  • Enron

    Enron and How it Affected the Accounting Industry Enron once was one the United States largest energy company and was ranked Fortune’s seventh richest corporation in the United States. When Enron had a filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy in 2001 it unraveled to be one the biggest accounting scandals in United States history. There are many factors that contributed to Enron’s demise but their aggressive and unethical accounting practices were the key component. As a result, the accounting industry...

    Accounting scandals, Arthur Andersen, Audit 1852  Words | 5  Pages

  • Enron

    collapse of Enron had substantial and far-reaching ramifications throughout the financial investment field, tax compliance professions and the accounting profession. Intense Congressional scrutiny resulted in a new era of transparency in financial reporting, stricter reporting standards as provided in Sarbanes-Oxley and substantial penalties for failure to comply with new financial reporting and tax compliance standards in the Internal Revenue Code (Bottiglieri et. al., 2009) Enron Assignment ...

    Accounting scandals, Andrew Fastow, Arthur Andersen 3112  Words | 7  Pages

  • Ethics and Enron

    ENRON Introduction Enron was the country’s largest trader and marketer for electric and natural gas energy. Its core business was buying energy at a negotiated price and later, selling the energy when prices increased. As an energy broker, Enron provided a service by allowing producers to negotiate a certain price while Enron took the risk that prices would fall below what it bought energy. Buyers of energy also benefited because Enron could ensure the supply of energy. In 2000 Enron was listed...

    Audit, Board of directors, Business ethics 1955  Words | 6  Pages

  • Enron

    Enron Case Study XXXXX XXXXXXXXX State College Enron Case Study Enron was a corporation founded in 1985, when a merger combined Houston Natural Gas and InterNorth (Thomas, 2002). Throughout the first five years of Enron’s existence, they had many struggles. According to Salter (2005), the first years had many “near death” experiences. Eventually Enron was able to prevail over their many “near death” experiences. In 1989, “Enron locked in its first fixed price contract to supply natural...

    Anxiety, Asset, Balance sheet 1600  Words | 6  Pages

  • Enron

    Natural Gas, became CEO, and the next year won the post of chairman. From the pipeline sector, Enron began moving into new fields. In 1999, the company launched its broadband services unit and Enron Online, the company's website for trading commodities, which soon became the largest business site in the world. About 90 per cent of its income eventually came from trades over Enron Online. Growth for Enron was rapid. In 2000, the company's annual revenue reached $100 billion US. It ranked as the seventh-largest...

    Accounting scandals, Andrew Fastow, Chief executive officer 562  Words | 3  Pages

  • Enron, the Smartest Guys in the Room.

    Enron, the Smartest Guys in the Room. Enron was involved in American’s largest corporate bankruptcy. It is a story about people, and in reality it is a tragedy. Enron made their stock sky rocket through unethical means, and in reality this company kept losing money. The primary value operating among the traders was greed, money, and how to make profits under any circumstance. The traders thought that a good trader is a creative trader and the creative trader can find any arbitrage opportunity...

    Adam Smith, Capitalism, Morality 1237  Words | 3  Pages

  • enron

    could have prevented the fall of Enron. First of all, if the board of directors made the right strategies for Enron rather than created hundreds of SPEs to remove assets and debts off balance sheet, the picture of Enron could have made a difference. Secondly, if the audit committee of Enron could point out all those aggressive and risky accounting treatment and propose solutions, then the afterward damages could be eliminate or at least minimized. c. The BOD of Enron should have known about the risks...

    Audit, Auditing, Auditor's report 878  Words | 3  Pages

  • Enron

     Enron Case Study A company’s leadership and culture influences its business ethics. A company’s culture is known as the organizational culture. It is the actions and beliefs of individuals that work at the company. All the shared values and enforced policies contribute to organizational culture. “The leadership culture appears as an integral part of the organizational culture and it can have a positive or negative influence upon the latter.” (Popa, 2013, p. 179). The organizational culture...

    Applied ethics, Business ethics, Enron 1448  Words | 5  Pages

  • Enron

    Enron The collapse of Enron Corporation an American energy, commodities and services based Company in Houston, Texas reinforces why unethical business practices are not the foundation for an enduring and sustainable enterprise. Good business practices is rewarding because it builds sustainable company, trust, integrity and organizational growth. In the article Enron ethics: Culture matters more than codes, reminded us that before the scandal, Enron appeared to have the best organization...

    Business, Business ethics, Corporate governance 700  Words | 3  Pages

  • Utilitarian Principles

     Utilitarian Principles Barbara Lawson AUPHI208 Instructor Sorensen October, 20, 2014 Utilitarian Principles In this assignment the theory that was chosen will be the utilitarian that applies to our respecting the environment. The utilitarian theory is that of J. S. Mills and environmental ethics. Utilitarian supports the position is that human interests are no more important or if no greater moral concern than the interests of the worth or their intrinsic value. “Utilitarianism...

    Animal rights, Ethics, Human 755  Words | 5  Pages

  • Enron

    represents the profits PNW can earn. In order to hedge the loss that unstable weather may bring, PNW could buy weather derivative contracts. If we could accurately predict the HDD next year, then we would know which contract of weather derivatives Enron offers would be the best fit for PNW. In this part we apply the statistical method of 95% confidence level to find out the possible range that future HDD may fall within. We then compare the HDD confidence level with the strike amount that these...

    Derivative, Derivatives, Normal distribution 1045  Words | 5  Pages

  • Ethical Theories in Finance

    Ethical Theories Sheri Wernert BUS 670: Legal Environment Professor Gentry December 19, 2010 Ethical Theories In every day life a person is bound to have ethical issues that must be decided. This is also true for the business world. With cases evolving each day of unethical companies such as Enron ethics is now being viewed as an important part of training for many companies. Which ethical theory to follow depends on the individual and there are many theories to be considered. How...

    Deontological ethics, Ethics, Justice 919  Words | 3  Pages

  • Enron Stakeholders

    BA 215 Spring 2007 Enron Stakeholder Assignment Enron was a dream come true for a lot of people, but it was also a nightmare waiting to happen for many more. I am going to examine the collapse of Enron from the management perspective. The three examples of Enron behaving badly that I am going to study are the incidents in Valhalla, the electricity trading in California and the conflict of interest between Andy Fastow and his special purpose entities (SPE). These are just a few cases that...

    Conspiracy of Fools, Energy crisis, Enron 1687  Words | 5  Pages

  • Utilitarian Arguments

    few for the good of the many. Utilitarian moral theories evaluate the moral worth of action on the basis of happiness that is produced by an action. Whatever produces the most happiness in the most people is the moral course of action. I will give the best arguments against Utilitarianism, and show in my own opinion, why I think they are wrong. The strongest counterargument against Utilitarianism would have to be Sterling Harwood’s eleven objections to the theory. Sterling Harwood states that...

    Consequentialism, Egoism, Ethical egoism 1694  Words | 4  Pages

  • How Might Theories of Leadership and Group Identity Help to Explain the Enron Collapse?

    How might theories of leadership and group identity help to explain the Enron collapse? Leadership means to motivate, influence and enable others to helps contribute towards the sucess of the organisation. The leadership of a company is one of the biggest reasons why a company will either fail or suceed. The leadership is the reason why Enron as a company failed, the leaders were inside trading with the companies stock shares for almost 10 years, which caused them to lose over 11 billion dollars...

    Andrew Fastow, Edgar Schein, Enron 1046  Words | 3  Pages

  • Abortion and Utilitarian

    Abortion A) Explain how a Utilitarian might respond to the issue of abortion Utilitarianism is a teleological theory basing the goodness of an action by its presumed consequences. The aim is ‘greatest happiness for the greatest number of people’ and Utilitarian’s base the ‘goodness’ of an action on human experience. There is no single view on the concept of abortion amongst utilitarian’s because there is variation on how utilitarian’s choose to apply the theory. Utilitarianism was described...

    Animal rights, Fetus, Jeremy Bentham 1023  Words | 3  Pages

  • Utilitarian Theory

    John Mill’s Utilitarianism theory * All his theory focuses on is maximizing utility for the greatest number of people possible * Moral as long as it is the “best action” to maximize happiness for the greatest number, even if a single person has to sacrifice * BP’s oil spill throughout the Gulf of Mexico is exactly the opposite from Mill’s theory because it actually minimizes utility for everyone who is affected. The spill devastated coastal beaches and businesses that relied on tourism...

    Categorical imperative, Deontological ethics, Immanuel Kant 492  Words | 2  Pages

  • Utilitarian Ethics

    major distinction between utilitarian and deontological reasoning. Make reference to all relevant aspects of the two positions including the 'act' and 'rule' versions along with pertinent examples that clarify your answer. The major distinction between Emmanual Kant’s deontological reasoning and Mill’s utilitarian reasonsing is that deontological reasoning refers to duty, which is usually determined without regard to circumstances or consequences where as utilitarian reasoning always considers...

    Categorical imperative, Deontological ethics, Ethics 760  Words | 3  Pages

  • Enron Scandal

    Current issue: Scandals in auditing Enron Scandal 1. Introduction Accounting scandals are political or business scandals which arise with the disclosure of financial misdeeds by trusted executives of corporations or governments. These days, not too often, these scandals are splashed as headlines across media. Why? Because there are complex groups of stakeholders who might be seriously affected by the scandals. Enron scam was the most remarkable scandal in 20 centuries by their institutionalized...

    Accounting scandals, Arthur Andersen, Big Four auditors 1464  Words | 5  Pages

  • Enron and Ethics

    Enron and Ethics Failure is the best teacher not only for those who fail, but also for those who observe the failure. Thus, for many businesses the Enron scandal proved to be the greatest teacher. Since the fall of Enron, there have been several theories and examinations about why it failed as it was a corporation that no one imagined would ever crash. Based on research to date there are multiple reasons for Enron’s failure; however, one that stands out immensely is corporate disregard for ethics...

    Applied ethics, Business, Business ethics 1117  Words | 3  Pages

  • Management and Enron Employees

    The Unexpected Collapse of Enron Colleen Long LDR/531 April 3, 2010 Kemit Grafton The Unexpected Collapse of Enron Beginning in 1985, Enron was formed through a merger of Houston Natural Gas and Internorth, Enron Corporation. It was the first nationwide natural gas pipeline network, which shifted its focus from regulate transportation of natural gas to unregulated energy trading markets. Enron was a huge company that traded electricity, oil, gas, plastics, and other variables...

    Business ethics, Enron, Enron scandal 1218  Words | 4  Pages

  • utilitarian essay

    Explain how a utilitarian might use the hedonic calculus in making moral decisions. Illustrate your answer with reference to any ethical issue (s) 30 mark The hedonic calculus is a method of working out the total pleasure and pain produced by an act or action and the total value of its consequences. It is also known as the Felicific Calculus; this method was founded by philosopher Jeremy Bentham. When determining whether an action is moral or not in a certain situation we must consider what the...

    Animal rights, Ethics, Hedonism 1532  Words | 4  Pages

  • Kasus Enron

    BISNIS DAN PROFESIONAL AKUNTAN DALAM MENILAI KINERJA PERUSAHAAN UNTUK KASUS ENRON LATAR BELAKANG Amerika Serikat yang selama ini dianggap sebagai Negara super power dan juga kiblat ilmu pengetahuan termasuk displin ilmu akuntansi harus menelan kepahitan. Skandal bisnis yang terjadi seakan menghilangkan kepercayaan oleh para pelaku bisnis dunia tentang praktik Good Corporate Governance di Amerika Serikat. Enron merupakan perusahaan dari penggabungan antara InterNorth (penyalur gas alam...

    1998  Words | 7  Pages

  • A UTILITARIAN ANALYSIS ON ENVIRONMENTAL DEGRADATION

    ETHICS INDIVIDUAL LITERATURE REVIEW: A UTILITARIAN ANALYSIS ON ENVIRONMENTAL DEGRADATION GIULIO SOLFRIZZI ID NUMBER:18046528 A UTILITARIAN ANALYSIS ON ENVIRONMENTAL DEGRADATION Environmental degradation is one of the most debated arguments through the ethic philosophers. Many theories have been advanced to justify and analyse which is the best behaviour humans should maintain in order to fulfil utilitarian doctrine and enhance social well-being. This review...

    Cost-benefit analysis, Environment, Ethics 1269  Words | 5  Pages

  • The Collapse of Enron Seemed to Be a Thumb in the Nose to the Efficient Markets Hypothesis and Agency Theory. Discuss.

    The collapse of Enron was entirely related to the accounting practices adopted by the company. It is a number of these questionable, and in some cases straight out fraudulent, accounting practices that pertained to the most dramatic collapse of a major company in years. An analysis of some of these accounting practices brings to light the problems with the use of concepts such as mark-to-market accounting and the use of special purpose entity’s (SPE’s). To say that the collapse “seemed to be a...

    Andrew Fastow, Efficient-market hypothesis, Enron 2232  Words | 6  Pages

  • Rise and Fall of Enron

    The rise and fall of Enron is a company that was lead to its own demise by it’s own leadership and ill business decisions. The motivational theories explained from the readings of Organization Behavior can correlate with the failure of Enron’s internal organization. Even though a company may appear to display successful business practices, the influence of leadership through management can ultimately lead the company to fail. Enron’s code of ethics prided itself on four key values; respect, integrity...

    Business ethics, Enron, Ethics 869  Words | 3  Pages

  • Discuss the Distinction Between a Fundamental and a Subordinate Moral Principle Using the Utilitarian Theory as an Example

    Discuss the distinction between a fundamental and a subordinate moral principle using the utilitarian theory as an example. A fundamental moral principle is a moral principle which is the ultimate basis for evaluating the rightness or wrongness of all acts. It is the ultimate and final reason in itself. It is the intrinsic value of the moral principle itself, not that it appeals to other moral principle or justified by other reasons, that makes it the fundamental moral principle. The absolutist...

    Ethics, Human, John Stuart Mill 1071  Words | 3  Pages

  • Enron James

    January 2, 2015 Auditing Theory Mr. Red Feliciano Enron Corporation’s Case Analysis Reference: Auditing and Assurance Principles by Jose Ireneo, Shirley Ireneo and George James 1. A. Fastow is one of the most responsible because being the Chief Financial Officer or CFO of the Enron corporation, he had a major influence. He was guilty of fraud, money...

    Arthur Andersen, Audit, Auditing 1149  Words | 3  Pages

  • Enron Scandal and Enron Representatives

    Based in Houston, Texas an American energy, commodities, and services company named ENRON CORPORATION was Ranked number 7 on the fortune 500 list in 2000, it was one of the most famous and largest integrated natural gas and electricity companies in the world. The company went bankruptcy on December 2, 2001. But before that it marketed natural gas liquids around the world and was working as one of the biggest natural gas transmission systems in the world, with transmissions over a massive area of...

    Accounting scandals, Arthur Andersen, Business ethics 1479  Words | 5  Pages

  • enron movie

    Enron: The Smartest Guys in the Room A white-collar crime by definition is a crime that is committed by individuals of higher status. It is not necessarily a violent crime, but could be depending on the situation. An individual who works in a professional environment, such as the government or corporation tend to take advantage of employees and manipulate them into thinking their practices are legitimate. Some examples, of white-collar crimes include fraud, embezzlement, insider trading, and other...

    Accounting scandals, Andrew Fastow, Crime 1622  Words | 4  Pages

  • Ethics Theory

    ETHICAL THEORIES 1. Utilitarianism The utilitarian ethical theory is founded on the ability to predict the consequences of an action. To a utilitarian, the choice that yields the greatest benefit to the most people is the choice that is ethically correct. One benefit of this ethical theory is that the utilitarian can compare similar predicted solutions and use a point system to determine which choice is more beneficial for more people. This point system provides a logical and rationale argument...

    Deontological ethics, Ethical theories, Ethics 1850  Words | 5  Pages

  • Capital Punishment Should Be Abolished: Views shared between Utilitarians, Egalitarians, Altruists and supporters of the Divine Command Theory

    family." All of these reasons prove to either be wrong or not fully supported. Morally, it is a continuation of the cycle of violence and degrades all who are involved in its enforcement, as well as its victim. Someone who supports the Divine Command Theory, or someone who believes solely in God's will, would say that capital punishment is wrong for a couple of reasons. The first reason is that executing someone is a lot like "playing God." Executing a person kills them before the time of their natural...

    Capital punishment, Death row, Jeremy Bentham 846  Words | 3  Pages

  • The Impact of Ethics on the Enron Corporation

    important to have especially in the business world. Ethics is the unwritten laws or rules defined by human nature; ethics is something people encounter as a child learning the differences between right and wrong. In 2001, Enron was the fifth largest company on the Fortune 500. Enron was also the market leader in energy production, distribution, and trading. However, Enron's unethical accounting practices have left the company in joint chapter 11 bankruptcy. This bankruptcy has caused many problems among...

    Accounting scandals, Arthur Andersen, Business ethics 2012  Words | 6  Pages

  • Compliance Theory

    INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF SCHOLARLY ACADEMIC INTELLECTUAL DIVERSITY VOLUME 14, NUMBER 1, 2012 Compliance Theory and Organizational Effectiveness Fred C. Lunenburg Sam Houston State University ________________________________________________________________________ ABSTRACT According to compliance theory, organizations can be classified by the type of power they use to direct the behavior of their members and the type of involvement of the participants. In most organizations, types...

    Motivation, Normative, Organization 1215  Words | 4  Pages

  • Case Study of Enron

    Response to organizations in art or entertainment (Enron, the Smartest Guys in the Room, 2005) Introduction There is a proverb “too good, to be true”, and it means the same, that some things are too great, to be real. In business world, it is often used to describe market conditions or companies under unbelievable success. Although, there were not too many companies that would fit the saying Enron was one of them. In a period of sixteen years, Enron’s value grew from 10 to 70 billion dollars...

    Andrew Fastow, Bureaucracy, Enron 1971  Words | 6  Pages

  • Theory

    role in adult personality. If a child does not successfully complete a stage, Freud suggested that he or she would develop a fixation that would later influence adult personality and behavior. Erik Erikson also proposed a stage theory of development, but his theory encompassed human growth throughout the entire lifespan. Erikson believed that each stage of development was focused on overcoming a conflict. For example, the primary conflict during the adolescent period involves establishing a sense...

    Albert Bandura, Behavior, Childhood 657  Words | 3  Pages

  • Feinberg's Theory of Punishment

    Joseph Chehova Professor Gotlib Presentation Paper Theory of Punishment Punishment is described by the Webster Dictionary as ‘the infliction or imposition of a penalty as retribution to an offense’. Today, this definition may pass as true for many governments, but years ago when philosophers were discussing ideas about government and laws, one idea that stuck out was that of punishment. Different theories rose regarding justifying punishment, and deciding the purpose behind punishing people. Joel...

    Crime, Criminal law, Criminology 859  Words | 4  Pages

  • Theory

    perspective 1. Behaviorism: Pavlov, Thorndike, Skinner 2. Neo-Behaviorism: Tolmann and Bandura B. Cognitive Perspective 1. Gestalt Psychology 2. Bruner’s constructivist Theory 3. Bruner’s constructivist theory 4. Ausebel’s Meaningful Verbal Learning / Subsumption Theory Prepared by: Nemarose Jane Tauyan Behaviorism: Pavlov, Thorndike, Skinner Pavlov (1849 - 1936) For most people, the name "Pavlov" rings a bell (pun intended). The Russian physiologist is...

    Behaviorism, Classical conditioning, Extinction 776  Words | 4  Pages

  • Theories

    Motivation theories can be classified broadly into two different perspectives: Content and Process theories. Content Theories deal with “what” motivates people and it is concerned with individual needs and goals. Maslow, Alderfer, Herzberg and McCelland studied motivation from a “content” perspective. Process Theories deal with the “process” of motivation and is concerned with “how” motivation occurs. Vroom, Porter & Lawler, Adams and Locke studied motivation from a “process” perspective. 1. Content...

    Abraham Maslow, Expectancy theory, Fundamental human needs 1835  Words | 7  Pages

  • THEORY OF ETHICS

    definition of ethics but we can describe the concept according to people orientation and perspective. Explain comprehensively the categories of the theory of Ethics viz a viz the sources of Public Ethics. There are four categories in theory: ABSOLUTIST THEORIES, RELATIVIST THEORIES, UTILITARIAN THEORIES, DEONTOLOGICAL THEORIES. First is the Absolutist theory it is an ethical view that particular actions are intrinsically right or wrong. Example for that is stealing we might considered it always as an...

    Aesthetics, Deontological ethics, Ethics 1314  Words | 8  Pages

  • the theory

    Template for Annotated Bibliography The journal article: Author(s) name(s): (Last name, first initial) Maftoon, P and, Sarem, S Year of publication: 2012 Title of the article: The Realization of Gardner's Multiple Intelligences (MI) Theory in Second Language Acquisition (SLA) Name of the journal: _____________________________________________________ Journal Number and Issue Number: Issue 6, 90355924 Article pages: p1233-1241 DOI number (if available): 10.4304/jltr.3.6.1233-1241 ...

    Education theory, Emotional intelligence, Howard Gardner 466  Words | 3  Pages

  • Enron: An Ethics Case Study

    Running head: Enron and Ethics Enron: An Ethics Case StudyEnron: An Introduction The previous decades have seen the birth and meteoric rise of several corporate giants such as Microsoft and Apple, both of which have all but become household names in this day and age. Neither achieved their level of success overnight, especially not since they have long been known to be in direct competition with each other. On the contrary, both of them have had their share of scandals and controversies...

    Andrew Fastow, Conspiracy of Fools, Enron 1834  Words | 6  Pages

  • Moral Theories in Health Care

    10/06/2009 Question 2: What moral theories are the most important in the healthcare reform debate? The four moral theories which have been refereed in the book satisfy one or the other aspect of the ethical analysis and also keep the foundation for further analysis. However no theory satisfies all the relevant criteria. All the four theories have pointed out their ways and means to reach a decision which is correct and ethically considered. All the theories have reached some of the goals in the...

    Categorical imperative, Consequentialism, Ethics 907  Words | 3  Pages

  • Enron Paper- Examining a Business Failure

    Enron- Examining a Business Failure University of Phoenix Organization Leadership LDR/531 Mr. January 12, 2010 Enron- Examining a Business Failure How did a multibillion dollar company arrive to the point of non existence? Was it the lack of organizational structure? Or maybe the lack of ethical management and leadership? One thing is certain and that is Enron has given the world a glance at how a leader within the energy industry, could have it all one minute, yet in a blink of...

    Business, Business ethics, Corporate governance 931  Words | 3  Pages

  • Organizational Design and the Failure of Enron

    Behavior and the Failure of Enron Germaine Washington LDR/531 February 13, 2012 James Kaczynski Organizational Design and the Failure of Enron This is an analysis of how the application of specific organizational-behavior theories could have predicted the failure of Enron. Although there are many types of core topics of organizational behavior, the focus of this study will be on how leader behavior and power, and motivation contributed to the bankruptcy of Enron. In addition, a comparison...

    Andrew Fastow, Enron, Jeffrey Skilling 1062  Words | 4  Pages

  • Theory

    and authority are closely related but theoretically different concepts (Faeth 2004). The exercise of power is legitimated through authority (Weber 1947) and Weber was the first to develop a systematic version of these terms as keystone of his social theory. Lewin (1941) developed the study of leadership by introducing the concept of social power in terms of the differential between interpersonal force and resistance. French and Raven described five sources of power namely reward power, coercive power...

    Authority, Max Weber, Organization 1497  Words | 5  Pages

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