The Utilitarian

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The Utilitarian, Libertarian and Rawlsian approach to Nestlé’s Ice Mountain Water| Justice Case Study Paper|
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Rochelle Carlisle|
1/31/2013|

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Many people believe that water is just nothing, which in a way they are somewhat correct. Have you ever looked at the label on bottled water? What do you see or better yet what don't you see. You don't see numbers on the nutritional facts of bottled water because water is just that nothing, or is it? Water makes up about 70 percent of the Earth's surface is, and the oceans hold about 96.5 percent of all Earth's water. The water bottling industry is worth over $65.9 billion dollars. Nestlé Company’s Ice Mountain bottled water plant is one of the newest companies to embark on the billion dollar industry. Nestle’ Ice Mountain company has invested $100 million to build a new 410,000-square-foot bottling plant in Mecosta County, Michigan. There is some controversy about how much is to be pumped out of the springs. Locals are staying that 262 million gallons a year is too much. Who is right? In this paper I am going to explore this case from three different perspectives utilitarian approach, the libertarian alternative, and the Rawlsian theories of justice. Then I will choose which approach I found the most helpful.

The Utilitarian approach holds that the maximization of happiness ultimately determines what is just and unjust. According to John Stuart Mill’s contended more specified that the concept of justice identifies certain rules or rights. Mill’s theory promotes well-being and injustice always involves violating the rights of some identifiable individual. Utilitarian’s favor whichever economic system will be the most good for society as a whole. As a Utilitarian the answer must depend on the relevant social, economic and political facts. In this situation Utilitarian would state that the environment is at risk no matter how much water Nestle’ draws out; the pumps need to be turned off. A...
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