• Lab Report
    Chapter 4 Functional Anatomy of Bacterial and Eukaryotic Cells Copyright © 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Lectures prepared by Christine L. Case Bacterial and Eukaryotic Cells Learning Objective 4-1 Compare and contrast the overall cell structure of bacteria and eukaryotes...
    Premium 1684 Words 7 Pages
  • Notes
    cytoplasmic streaming supplemented by active transport. Transport over longer distances proceeds through the vascular system (the xylem and the phloem) and is called translocation. An important aspect that needs to be considered is the direction of transport. In rooted plants, transport in xylem (of...
    Premium 6638 Words 27 Pages
  • chemistry
    needed for solutes to get through at reasonable rate If metabolic inhibitor (stops ATP production) is put into phloem, translocation stops- evidence active transport is involved There’s experimental model for mass flow Evidence both for and against mass flow: ...
    Premium 6822 Words 28 Pages
  • Biochemistry
    differentiation. Cells that have undergone neoplastic transformation usually express cell surface antigens that may be of normal fetal type, may display other signs of apparent immaturity, and may exhibit qualitative or quantitative chromosomal abnormalities, including various translocations and the appearance...
    Premium 19283 Words 78 Pages
  • Bio 11 Exam Review Notes
    Genetics Unit - Describe the events that occur during each stage of mitosis and meiosis. Recognize diagrams / electron micrographs of each stage. Compare and contrast mitosis and meiosis. MITOSIS: Interphase: G1 phase-metabolism occurring, normal cell functions, vigorous cell growth. S phase-DNA...
    Premium 7664 Words 31 Pages
  • Translocation
    Translocation A. The Munch pressure flow model The Principal of Pressure-Flow Model of Phloem Transport The Münch pressure-flow model is an explanation for the movement of organic materials in phloem .By the Münch pressure-flow experiment, two dialysis tubings are connected by a glass tube...
    Premium 1299 Words 6 Pages
  • Transport in Living Organisms
    explain the mechanisms of translocation of substances through sieve is the …………….. (x) Whole blood minus blood cells is called…………. (xi) Plasma minus fibrinogen is called …………… (xii) Haemoglobin transports oxygen as a loose reversible compound the………………… (xiii) The average number of leukocytes in man...
    Premium 3635 Words 15 Pages
  • my life
    communication, channels for passive transport, and pumps for active transport. 2.4.4 Define diffusion and osmosis. 1 Diffusion is the passive movement of particles from a region of high concentration to a region of low concentration. Osmosis is the passive movement of water molecules...
    Premium 38602 Words 155 Pages
  • Plant Growth and Development
    structure; but very soon it becomes self-supporting and in a short time starts to export PS. As long as the plant is young, this export is mainly directed towards centres of active growth, such as developing leaves, root tips, or shoot apices; but later on much of the assimilate transport is...
    Premium 3958 Words 16 Pages
  • Malcolm X a Homemade Education
    sign and symptoms of the disorder. Another are location that can cause down syndrome is called a chromosome translocation. This is an even that unlike the numerical abnormally causing trisomy 21, there is a structural abnormality. Exchange of material from two different chromosomes during the...
    Premium 4645 Words 19 Pages
  • Ft.Lauderdale High Ap Bio Project
    : structural ;storage ;transport; defensive; regulatory f. examples and biological significance of each major group and subgroup( hint some common proteins are keratin, collagen antibodies, enzymes, hemoglobin ,actin, myosin) 8. Compare and contrast prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. Give examples of each...
    Premium 2107 Words 9 Pages
  • STUDENT OBJECTIVES
    of membranes (permeable, partially-permeable and impermeable); describe the phenomena of diffusion, facilitated diffusion, osmosis, active transport, endocytosis and exocytosis with examples; compare passive transport of matter by diffusion and osmosis with active transport (e.g. diffusion of...
    Premium 10687 Words 43 Pages
  • The Best Attitude
    Define diffusion and osmosis. 2.4.5 Explain passive transport across membranes by simple diffusion and facilitated diffusion. 2.4.6 Explain the role of protein pumps and ATP in active transport across membranes. 2.4.7 Explain how vesicles are used to transport materials within a cell between the rough...
    Premium 8611 Words 35 Pages
  • physics 9
    4- a. Compare/contrast prokaryotes and eukaryotes b. Label the parts of animal and plant cells and define the function of the organelles in those cells. c. Compare/contrast animal and plant cells d. Why is cell size limited? e. How does cell function dictate structure? f. Terms: Cell Theory...
    Premium 630 Words 3 Pages
  • Biology
    can pass through the membrane whereas larger molecules cannot. The processes by which molecules move from one solution to another across the membrane are either passive (the cell expends no energy) or active (the cells expends energy). Passive transport includes diffusion and osmosis. Diffusion is...
    Premium 6706 Words 27 Pages
  • Practice Exam
    . Discuss the electron transport chain with regard to: a) its composition, b) its function in cellular respiration, c) its location in eukaryotes versus prokaryotes, and d) role in chemiosmosis. 43. Compare and contrast aerobic respiration, anaerobic respiration, and fermentation. 44...
    Premium 1313 Words 6 Pages
  • thesis about wildlife&bio-diversity
    , E. W. 1997. Improving translocation programs. Conservation Biology 11:1270- 1271. Hubbard, B. and T. Serfass. 2004. Assessing the distribution of reintroduced populations of river otters in Pennsylvania (USA); Development of a landscape- level approach. IUCN Otter Specialist Group Bulletin 21...
    Premium 10596 Words 43 Pages
  • Discuss the Oncogenic Role of Immunoglobulin Heavy and Light Chain Genes in Lymphoid Malignancy, Using as Examples Follicular Lymphoma and Burkitt’s Lymphoma.
    translocations involving one of the Ig loci and a proto-oncogene is a key feature in the pathogenesis of many types of B-cell lymphoma. Such translocations cause the oncogene to come under the control of the active Ig locus. Consequently, there is a deregulated, constitutive expression of the...
    Premium 1546 Words 7 Pages
  • Life Process Extra Notes
    ] 29. Name the largest artery in the human body. [2005] 16. What is meant by ‘translocation’ with respect to transport in plants? [2007] 30. What makes the red blood corpuscles (cells) [2005] red? 31. A farmer floods his field every day thinking that watering in this manner will...
    Premium 6834 Words 28 Pages
  • Significance Biology
    the entire body Blood * the fluid that circulates in the heart, arteries, capillaries, and veins of a vertebrate animal carrying nourishment and oxygen to and bringing away waste products from all parts of the body * Red Blood(mammals) * Red cell groups act as markers (inherited...
    Premium 2513 Words 11 Pages