"Can Knowledge Be A Burden Rather Than A Benefit" Essays and Research Papers

  • Can Knowledge Be A Burden Rather Than A Benefit

    Knowledge is like a drug, the more you gains, the more one craves. It’s widely acknowledged that the knowledge is a powerful force, which exerted in everyone’s body. Retrospectively, from the history and my own experiences, knowledge can either enhance life or became destructive. If human beings do not use it properly, knowledge may produce an injurious influence in science. What’s more, knowledge can perplex adolescent through their growth. However, this does not mean that knowledge isn’t significant...

    Atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Cognition, Cold War 508  Words | 2  Pages

  • Can Knowledge Be A Burden Rather Than A Benefit

    Can Knowledge Be A Burden Rather Than A Benefit? There is a serious attention paid to the issue that whether knowledge is a burden rather than a benefit. To all intents and purposes, there are various opinions on the issue. In my narrow perspective, knowledge is just irrelevant, if there's no knowledge, there will be no chance for us to make the world a better place. In the first place, knowledge is the base for all our enormous inventions, despite the legends such as the electricity or the telescope...

    Aesthetics, Disease, Existential quantification 394  Words | 2  Pages

  • Knowledge Management: The benefits of implementing knowledge managemnt in a company.

    treating organizational knowledge as a valuable asset to leading organizations has been popularized by leading management and organization theorists. Organizations are being advised that in order to remain competitive, they must efficiently and effectively create, locate, capture, and share their organization's knowledge and expertise, and have the ability to use that knowledge on specific problems and opportunities. Firms are showing a tremendous interest in implementing knowledge management processes...

    Community of practice, Descriptive knowledge, Explicit knowledge 2108  Words | 7  Pages

  • Burden of cancer globally

    determinants of population are more important than individual characteristics. He supported his argument by providing evidence of the study on population distribution of serum cholesterol in East Finland and differences in the distributions of blood pressure among Kenya and London. Thus, the characteristics of population are more important in determining the incidence and prevalence of disease than characteristics of individual. The statement that occurrence of disease can be more in large number of people with...

    Cancer, Epidemiology, Lung cancer 1736  Words | 3  Pages

  • Hazing a Benefit or Burden

    Hazing: A Benefit or Burden The concept of hazing has long since been a source of debate, yet it has also served as a means of training designed to save lives. Hazing has been around almost as long as mankind but its formal introduction became most apparent in the military. Hazing is used to bring a group of people together as a unit and teach them a great deal of information in a short amount of time. Hazing is designed as a consequence based teaching method where a mistake leads to...

    Abuse, Dedovshchina, Fraternities and sororities 2691  Words | 7  Pages

  • Can Knowledge Be Harmful

    friends about dating and she said "the knowledge that he's going out with her is painful enough." This got me thinking. Is it knowledge itself that is harmful and that we should not seek/know, or is knowledge impartial and it is the person that is harmful or construes the knowledge as harmful? In order to answer this question, I first asked myself: what is knowledge? While the question is remarkably broad, I simply took a simple definition and considered it: knowledge is a body of truths or facts gained...

    Biology, Cell, Computer 1226  Words | 3  Pages

  • The Burden of the Sarbanes Oxley Act

    Financial Information Analysis: The Burden of the Sarbanes Oxley Act Table of Contents Executive Summary 3 Introduction 4 Sarbanes Oxley Act 2002: The Burden it places on companies 5 Cost of Compliance 5 Cost of Finance to U.S Companies 5 Fees and Audit 6 Reduced Competition 7 Conclusion 8 References 9 Executive Summary The Sarbanes Oxley Act, named after its two main sponsors, Senator Paul Sarbanes and Congressman Mike Oxley is a legislation that must be complied by all...

    Audit, Auditing, Economics 1518  Words | 5  Pages

  • The Burden of Knowledge

    Ashikur Chowdhury BHSEC Queens English Literature Mr. Pickard The Burden of Knowledge In the book, Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave written by himself, Douglass has very passionate and interesting opinions and feelings about how knowledge is a path to freedom. Douglass feels that everyone is entitled to a chance to be educated. As Douglass grows older, he concludes that slave owners mistreat their...

    Abraham Lincoln, Education, Frederick Douglass 779  Words | 2  Pages

  • Home Work Is Beneficial or Burden

    is Beneficial or Burden? Homework is defined as piece work done at home or an assignment given to students to be completed outside regular class work or preparatory reading or research for discussion. Homework is whether a burden or not that cannot be decided randomly. It may include the analysis of various factors that declares it as a burden and on the other hand a necessity. One of the factor, however is the teachers who assigns the homework as if the intensions are to burden students and to just...

    Activity, Alfie Kohn, Education 1406  Words | 4  Pages

  • What Benefits Can Traveling Give?

    What Benefits Can Traveling Give? Leisure traveling has many benefits. It is no wonder that many people love to travel. It is very common, nowadays, for people to just get away on a vacation trip any time. Some even consider traveling as part of their routine lifestyle. Perhaps, the reason for its popularity is because more people have come to realize the benefits of traveling. People from all walks of life, both young and old, enjoy traveling. Most of the younger travelers tend to seek for...

    Benefit of clergy, Holiday, Recreation 820  Words | 3  Pages

  • Knowledge Management and Networking Attitude

    Attitude In 2002 The Networking Attitude was launched as a new way of communication to enable and encourage staffs in different work sites to share knowledge and good practices in the enterprise. MAKE IT YOURS As employee’s commitment is very important, several social tools were designed to make people enjoy the activity and see how knowledge exchange can benefit them. Such social tools include Marketplace - Marketplace is a two-hour activity held during other meetings scheduled by the target group....

    Best practice, Business terms, Emerging markets 1048  Words | 3  Pages

  • Lack of Knowledge Thesis Examination

    Lack of Knowledge Jay Stuckey "Knowledge is power." This is a famous phrase that has a lot of truth to it. What if the knowledge is incomplete? Is it still powerful or just a burden? Frankenstein and his creature are a prime example of the burden brought on one's life through incomplete knowledge. Frankenstein has a great grasp of knowledge of the physical world but lacks that grasp of knowledge of the emotional world. He creates a creature with the mind of a human but with a body that...

    Emotion, Frankenstein, Human 2454  Words | 7  Pages

  • A little knowledge can be a dangerous thing

    Alexander Pope once said, "A little learning is a dangerous thing." (Phrase Finder) This essentially means a small amount of knowledge can cause people to think they are more expert than they are and consequently make unwise choices. An individual's confidence of being an expert on a subject when in reality he is not can be a hazardous state of mind and has never been more apparent than in the twentieth century. The nuclear reactor meltdown at Three Mile Island in New Jersey illustrates the validity of...

    Germany, Hungary, Israel 1529  Words | 4  Pages

  • Can Training Benefits Be Measured

    Can training benefits be accurately measured? It is without doubt that customer satisfaction is imperative for the very existence of any organization. Customer satisfaction could be viewed as an element, which fuels the sustainability of organisations to operate. However, very few consider customer satisfaction as a measuring tool in determining the effectiveness of training programs in organisations. Bregman and Jacobson’s article though introduces and attempts to determine whether organizations...

    Argument, Articles of Confederation, Logic 1157  Words | 4  Pages

  • Ibm's Knowledge Management Proposal

    employees to feel as one and function as a ministry with modest limitations. EDU has to take the tacit knowledge and turn it into explicit knowledge. As Kathryn Everest, I would recommend the EDU implement a document management system. In doing so, it will help the employees to work mutually as a company rather then a department. Having the employees to feel they are all part of a company rather than a department will help build trust amongst all employees. Less time will be spent locating documents;...

    Document management system, Explicit knowledge, Information science 1720  Words | 6  Pages

  • How Social Media Can Benefit Your Business

    1) Social networking can build up your online reputation and your brand. A) Do this through Facebook is by connecting vendors to one another. Your efforts will be appreciated and could be rewarded by those you've helped connecting you with a vendor who may be interested in putting some business your way. i. Passing on relevant links and posts to your customers and asking them for their reaction. Your customers will feel you value their opinion and don't just see them as your 'target market'...

    Advertising, Facebook, Marketing 2001  Words | 6  Pages

  • The High Value Of Knowledge

     Knowledge is information that is understood to a point that it can be used as a skill to help oneself in certain situations. The reason that it is so highly valued is because it can be difficult to obtain. There is so much information in the world that not all knowledge can be known and acquired to benefit those who hold it. How does one learn knowledge? The topic I chose states that there are only two ways in which humankind can produce knowledge: through passive observation or through active...

    Cognition, Decision making, Empiricism 1264  Words | 5  Pages

  • Can literature “tell the truth” better than other arts or other areas of knowledge?

    Can literature “tell the truth” better than other arts or other areas of knowledge? John Stuart Mill once proclaimed that there are many truths of which the full meaning cannot be realized until personal experience has brought it home. This means that one cannot perceive the truth without understanding it. For example one cannot know the truth of Pythagoras’s theorem being that a right angled triangle’s hypotenuse’s square value is equal to the squares of both its other sides. This is because...

    Axiomatic system, Deductive reasoning, Fiction 2040  Words | 6  Pages

  • “the Knowledge We Value the Most Is the Knowledge for Which We Can Provide the Strongest Justifications.” to What Extent Would You Agree with This Claim?

    water, then you do not know it. Believing is a requirement of knowing. That said, how justified must our beliefs be to constitute knowledge? How valuable is this knowledge in which we believe in? I suppose in our society today, the value of knowledge at most times is dependent on the justifications that we give it. It would seem reasonable to believe that knowledge with the strongest justification is the most valuable, but why? Justification is seen to add value to information and is relative...

    Critical thinking, Electric charge, Electron 990  Words | 3  Pages

  • The "Global" and the "Local" in Knowledge Management

    head: The "Global" and the "Local" in Knowledge Management Victor De Jesus University of Mary Washington Introduction In a world were people with specialized skills are hard to find, corporations must find a way to hold on to their corporate knowledge. Many times this knowledge resides in the head of a person, which creates a situation when the employee decides to stop working for the corporation. A knowledge gap is created at the time of departure and it will require...

    Corporation, Knowledge, Knowledge management 1056  Words | 3  Pages

  • The Importance of Knowledge

    try to shed some light on knowledge from Islamic perspective. Generally speaking, the Arabic word for knowledge is 'ilm, which, in most cases, indicates to Islamic knowledge or matters related to Sheree’ah (Islamic Law). Although, some of the Quranic verses in this article refer to Islamic knowledge, yet they are general in their meaning, and thus can be used to refer to learning in general. The importance of education is a none disputable matter. Education is the knowledge of putting one's potentials...

    Hadith, Islam, Muhammad 1395  Words | 4  Pages

  • Imagination Is More Important Than Knowledge

    ‘Imagination is more important than knowledge’ The sum or range of what has been perceived, discovered or learned is what every dictionary or scientist would answer when one would ask them to define knowledge. Imagination, is what these scientists and dictionaries would answer when they were given the question to state one word on the following: ‘The faculty of imagining, or of forming mental images or concepts of what is not actually present to the senses.’ In 1929, Albert Einstein was brave enough...

    Albert Einstein, Earth, Equals sign 1369  Words | 4  Pages

  • Theory of Knowledge

    in the pursuit of knowledge? Most are driven by interest and the curiosity to know the unknown; this in turn is the pursuit of knowledge. Any person can achieve curiosity but achieving an open mind in order to accept the knowledge one wants to know is also part of it. Depending on whether or not a person has an open mind to what they are exposed to can influence whether or not they can become capable of learning new information and developing that new information into knowledge and new perspectives...

    Cognition, Emotion, Linguistic relativity 1680  Words | 4  Pages

  • Of Mice and Men: Burdens of Responsibility

    Of Mice and Men: Burdens of Responsibility "OF MICE AND MEN IS A NOVEL WHICH EXPLORES THE BURDENS OF RESPONSIBILITY AS MUCH AS ITS REWARDS." By evaluating the novel of mice and men carefully I have found that every character in the novel has a facet of life that consists of burdens and responsibilities. The characters in the novel basically have three options in which they can live their lives. They can knuckle down, work hard, keep a positive frame of mind and try earnestly to improve their standard...

    Great Depression, John Steinbeck, Novella 1037  Words | 3  Pages

  • Psychological, Physical and Mental Burdens of the Troops in "The Things They Carried"

    own experiences as knowledge. In his short story “The Things They Carried” he skillfully reveals realistic scenes that portray psychological, physical and mental burdens carried by every soldier. He illustrates these burdens by discussing the weights that the soldiers carry, their psychological stress and the mental stress they have to undergo as each of them endure the harshness and ambiguity of the Vietnam War. One question we have to ask ourselves is if the three kinds of burdens carried by the soldier’s...

    Posttraumatic stress disorder, Psychological trauma, Rape 1378  Words | 4  Pages

  • Can literature “tell the truth” better than other Arts or Areas of Knowledge? Essay

    International Baccalaureate Theory of Knowledge #5 Can literature “tell the truth” better than other Arts or Areas of Knowledge? Even as children, people are on a never-ending quest for “the truth.” Anyone who has witnessed a toddler incessantly ask his mother “Why?” can attest to that. Writers, artists, and scientists all have methods of finding “truth” and telling it to others. While the standards for what truth can be vary between Areas of Knowledge, no Area of Knowledge is significantly more capable...

    Epistemology, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Fiction 1696  Words | 5  Pages

  • I'D Rather Smoke Than Kiss

    In the 1990 article “I’d Rather Kiss than Smoke” in the National Review, Florence King tries to persuade her readers to look through a smoker’s eyes in a smokist world. King has been around people smoking even before she was born. Her mother started smoking when she was twelve and she started this habit when she was twenty-six. Since she started smoking, she has been analyzing how non-smokers discriminate against them. Florence King expects everyone to be okay with smoking because it is what...

    Discrimination, Hatred, Passive smoking 958  Words | 3  Pages

  • Knowledge Based Systems

    What is a knowledge-based system? A system which is built around a knowledge base. i.e. a collection of knowledge, taken from a human, and stored in such a way that the system can reason with it. Example: System: What is the patient's name? User: George Smith System: What is the patient's age? User: 52 years System: Is the patient male or female? User: Male System: What are the symptoms? User: Headache dizziness upset stomach high fever System: When did these symptoms first appear? User:...

    Artificial intelligence, Artificial neural network, Expert 1119  Words | 5  Pages

  • Burden of Proof

    Evidence April 4, 2013 Burden of Proof Does anyone know what the most important rule of evidence is in the trial of civil cases? If you said “The Burden Of Proof”, you would be right. In a criminal trial the burden of proof is required of the prosecutor to prove the guilt of the accused is ”beyond , a reasonable doubt” much more difficult hurdle than the preponderance of proof required in a civil case. The person bringing the lawsuit, the plaintiff has the burden of proving the elements...

    Criminal law, Criminal procedure, Evidence 1558  Words | 5  Pages

  • ‘The vocabulary we have does more than communicate our knowledge; it shapes what we can know’. Evaluate this claim with reference to different areas of knowledge.

    When mankind created vocabulary little did they know of its complications in the 21st century world. Knowledge acquisition and vocabulary has a unique relationship, which is directly linked to Language as a Way of Knowing. The claim discusses whether our vocabulary is a simple reaction to our previous knowledge or is our knowledge acquisition shaped by the vocabulary we know. On one hand, our vocabulary had become so influential that our world is completely built and dependent on it, which is the...

    Benjamin Lee Whorf, Edward Sapir, Knowledge 1833  Words | 5  Pages

  • Theory of Knowledge Full Essay- Language and Vocabulary

    Q: The vocabulary we have does more than communicate our knowledge; it shapes what we can know. Evaluate this claim with reference to different areas of knowledge. According to the Sapir-Whorf Theory, language is not merely a reproducing instrument for voicing ideas but rather is the shaper of ideas. The Sapir-Whorf Thesis states that language controls what we think and determines and limits our thoughts. Many language experts identify with the Sapir-Whorf Theory and among these is Wittgenstein...

    Aloe vera, Constructed language, Knowledge 1854  Words | 5  Pages

  • The Benefits and Problems of Migration in the UK

    that too many immigrants could lead to overpopulation, unemployment and housing shortages. It is commonly believed that migration should be controlled, as migrants ‘come over to our country and take our benefits’; however this is not necessarily factually correct. This essay aims to discuss the benefits and problems of migration in the UK, and make a conclusion based on the evidence I have discussed, about whether migration should or should not be controlled by the UK Government. The UK’s post-war...

    British Empire, England, Europe 1488  Words | 4  Pages

  • Designing Compensation Systems and Employee Benefits

    Designing Compensation Systems and Employee Benefits Tameka Clark Compensation Management/BUS 409 February 26, 2012 Professor Munro Designing Compensation Systems and Employee Benefits A compensation system has an important role in a company. An ideal compensation system can motivate employees to enhance their job performance. An organization can use adequate compensation to retain talented employees. Retaining talented employees is important because they help organizations...

    Disability insurance, Employment, Employment compensation 2269  Words | 7  Pages

  • Benefits of Higher Education

    about many different topics. This means companies are looking for people who can hit the ground running when they hire them. In addition to one’s knowledge they possess, a college diploma is very important while job hunting. According to the essay, “Are they really ready to work”, “Young people need a range of skills, both basic academic skills as well as the ability to apply these skills and knowledge in the workplace. At the high school level, well over one-half of new entrants...

    Academic degree, College, Education 818  Words | 4  Pages

  • Compensation and Benefits

     Compensation and Benefits Recommendations HRM 531 No matter the size of the business, there is a need to evaluate an individual business’ compensations and Benefits. Each business will be unique; rarely will two businesses have the same benefits. These benefits will show employees, and future employees, what it is worth to work for the company. In this recommendation, it will outline various parts of the compensation and identify the pay act that this package will follow...

    Employee benefit, Employment compensation, Health economics 1765  Words | 7  Pages

  • Benefits of Scientific Knowledge on Health and Behavior

    entertained. These all evidences show the blessings of scientific knowledge on humans. <br> <br>Before eighteenth century we were plunged in the depths of ignorance and unawareness of scientific knowledge. Without having an adequate scientific knowledge, our ancestors had buried their common senses deep under the mask of ignorant personalities but it was the scientific revolution in nineteenth century that unsheathed it and now we can see that the whole world is globalized due to this scientific revolution...

    Human, Human behavior, Industrial Revolution 1011  Words | 3  Pages

  • The Possession of Knowledge Carries an Ethical Responsibility. Evaluate This Claim

    Throughout the average day one is constantly acquiring knowledge, whether that is of what a vector is, or what their friend thinks of their mother. Some of this knowledge is sought out, some is accidentally gained, but all of this carries an ethical responsibility transferable to the newly knowledgeable subject. Ethics and reason are two key factors to the claim that knowledge carries an ethical responsibility, and are transferable in their standardized definition to make this claim reliable. ...

    Business ethics, Epistemology, Ethics 1452  Words | 4  Pages

  • Knowledge and Emotion

    10. “There can be no knowledge without emotion…. until we have felt the force of the knowledge, it is not ours” (adapted from Arnold Bennett). Discuss this vision of the relationship between knowledge and emotion. There are multiple ways to obtain knowledge, but of the ways which one makes the knowledge ours? That’s the question Mr. Arnold Bennet was getting at when he says, “There can be no knowledge without emotion…until we have felt the force of the knowledge it is not ours.” One can acquire knowledge...

    Bias, Emotion, Epistemology 1783  Words | 5  Pages

  • The Benefits of Cohabitation

    cohabitation rates, particularly those in Europe. However, it is often seen as entailing fewer responsibilities at the legal, economic, and even emotional levels, so the author of the article thinks that the disadvantages of cohabitation are more than benefits. Actually, what are the reasons made the author think that? And what are the disadvantages? In the article, it shows the characteristics define the essential boundaries between cohabitation and married, such as age, fertility, stability, social...

    Alimony, Civil union, Cohabitation 801  Words | 3  Pages

  • Indigenous Knowledge and Scientific Knowledge

    In this essay the paradoxes and difficulties associated with the ongoing debate between ‘Indigenous Knowledge’ and scientific knowledge will be thoroughly discussed. An attempt will be made to take a stand and decide whether ‘Indigenous Knowledge’ and ‘Scientific Knowledge’ should have distinct boundaries or whether they are able to co-exist successfully. In order to do this, reference will mainly be drawn from readings by L. Green (2012), M. Leach and J. Fairhead (2002). I will draw on evidence...

    Epistemology, Falsifiability, Indigenous peoples 1606  Words | 5  Pages

  • Critical Evaluation of the Benefits and Limitations of Using Ict in Knowledge Management Processes

    Critical Evaluation of the Benefits and Limitations of Using ICT in Knowledge Management Processes 1.0 Introduction Knowledge management can be considered to be an essential strategic function in any organisation today. As the world becomes more globalised, and traditional structures of intermediation are removed whilst new ones are created, it is clear that knowledge, and consequently a learning organisation is one that is more likely to find unique sources of competitive advantage, and be...

    Community of practice, Ikujiro Nonaka, Knowledge 2359  Words | 7  Pages

  • The Benefits of Kaizen and Kaizen Events

    close ↑ The Benefits of Kaizen and Kaizen Events Anthony Manos. Quality Progress. Milwaukee: Feb 2007. Vol. 40, Iss. 2; pg. 47, 2 pgs Abstract (Summary) Kaizen is a Japanese word typically translated to "continuous improvement." The connotation of the word morphed to also include quick or fast improvements, like kaizen events, which are big improvements that are made quickly. The tools of lean, such as kaizen and kaizen events, are not necessarily rocket science. Getting people to hold a philosophy...

    Better, Improve, Kaizen 1727  Words | 5  Pages

  • Different Perspectives and Approaches to Managing Knowledge

    approaches to managing knowledge may lead to an organisation’s competitive advantage, supporting your views with pertinent literature and examples. Knowledge management (KM) is a relatively new concept that emerged 15 or 20 years ago and which presents knowledge as a process, rather as something that people have. Blacker (1995) himself talks of “knowing as a process”, thus something far more complex and ambiguous than the classical and cognitive views that we could have of knowledge. Moreover, this...

    Albert Bandura, Knowledge, Knowledge management 1885  Words | 6  Pages

  • Ten Principles of Knowledge Management

    Many companies are beginning to feel that the knowledge of their employees is their most valuable asset. They may be right, but few firms have actually begun to actively manage their knowledge assets on a broad scale. Knowledge management has thus far been addressed at either a philosophical or a technological level, with little pragmatic discussion on how knowledge can be managed and used more effectively on a daily basis. At this early stage of knowledge management in business, the most appropriate...

    Community of practice, Ikujiro Nonaka, Knowledge 1952  Words | 6  Pages

  • Tok imagination is stronger than knowledge

    more important than knowledge. For knowledge is limited to all we now know and understand, while imagination embraces the entire world, and all there ever will be to know and understand” is a quote by Albert Einstein. This quote is very complex and controversial, for many people can agree and disagree with it. Imagination challenges what someone knows to what someone thinks he or she knows. To many people, imagination is greater than knowledge. Imagination is the base to all knowledge. For without...

    Albert Einstein, Cognition, Epistemology 1249  Words | 3  Pages

  • Benefits of a Liberal Arts Degree in Appellate Court Judges

    Benefits of a Liberal Arts Education in Appellate Court Judges Appellate Court judges are the final stop for most of the federal cases in the United States. They hear cases which come from large areas or regions, often encompassing a large number of cultural variances. Rather than hold trials, appellate court judges review decisions of trial courts for errors of law. Court of appeals decisions, unlike those of the lower federal courts, establish binding precedents. Other federal courts...

    Appeal, Appellate court, Court 1234  Words | 4  Pages

  • Theory of Knowledge

    TOK ESSAY PLAN “… our knowledge is only a collection of scraps and fragments that we put together into a pleasing design, and often the discovery of one new fragment would cause us to alter utterly the whole design” (Morris Bishop). To what extent is this true in history and one other area of knowledge? To what extent = Ex: (Nat Sciences- atomic theory) (History- soviet archives opened- new outlook, perspective) KI: RLS: Assumption: Implication: AOK: WOK: 5: This is a bit of an intellectual...

    Epistemology, Humanities, Natural science 559  Words | 3  Pages

  • Common Sense As a Source of Knowledge

    Sources of Knowledge There are many sources of knowledge as the society progresses. In this case, the most controversial question would be whether or not common sense can be accounted as a reliable source of knowledge? Although both common sense and science can be taken into account as sources of knowledge, I will argue that to some extent common sense and scientific knowledge are still very different from one another. That is, scientific knowledge is much more highly valued and reliable than common...

    Bertrand Russell, Empirical, Epistemology 1381  Words | 4  Pages

  • Knowledge Management Mastercard

    Knowledge management Year 2012-2013 Final assignment MasterCard Product Knowledge University of Groningen Faculty of Economics and Business Page 3………………………………………………………………. The company Page 4……………………………………………………………….. The research Page 5……………………………………………………………………… Question Page 5 …………………The products and commercial departments Page 5 ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………Processes Page 6 ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………Tasks...

    Bookkeeping, Citibank, Credit card 1626  Words | 6  Pages

  • Siemens - Knowledge Management

    product business to a service focus and solutions approach increased the complexity and knowledge intensity of Siemens’ business. As Joachim Döring, ICN manger recalls: “Suddenly, our salespeople were facing the challenge of having to offer solutions rather than precisely defined products. That significantly increased our influence on the value-added chain as far as customers were concerned.” (Heading for Knowledge-Guided Networks, Sabine Saphörster In the new market setting, the sales force at...

    Community of practice, Knowledge, Knowledge engineering 2225  Words | 6  Pages

  • Is the Knowledge We Gain from the Natural Sciences More Reliable Than the Knowledge We Gain from the Human Sciences

    Is the knowledge we gain from the NATURAL SCIENCES more reliable than the knowledge we gain from the HUMAN SCIENCES? When I first pondered over the question in class confidently my thoughts were natural sciences, of course, but before long I was left bewildered. I realized I had taken the reliability of all sciences for granted, who’s to say any one is more reliable than the other? What even makes something reliable? I strongly believe the reliability of knowledge soundly depends on the variety...

    Mathematics, Natural science, Nature 1214  Words | 4  Pages

  • "The Knowledge That We Value the Most Is the Knowledge for Which We Can Provide the Strongest Justifications." to What Extent Would You Agree with This Claim?

    I strongly believe that the knowledge an individual possesses or the amount of experience one can boast of play a really important role in that individual’s life as these are the only predicaments upon which he can rely to make decisions and defend them. The proximity between the knowledge a person possesses and true knowledge may be distinct or may be spot on. Every person grows up in a certain environment, attains a particular way and kind of living and education respectively. Hence, inevitably...

    Belief, Epistemology, Human 1309  Words | 3  Pages

  • Illegal Immigration: Too Large a Burden on America

    Illegal Immigration: Too Large a Burden on America “Households headed by illegal aliens imposed more than 26.3 billion dollars in costs on the federal government…and paid only 16 billion dollars in taxes, creating a net fiscal deficit of almost 10.4 billion dollars, or two thousand seven hundred dollars per illegal household” (Miller 1). Some people would argue that immigrants come to America to take jobs that no one else will do, but the illegal immigrants are in fact draining social services...

    Federal government of the United States, Health care, Illegal immigration 1219  Words | 4  Pages

  • Selecting, Developing, Managing and Retaining Knowledge Workers

    manage and retain knowledge workers? As Peter Drucker recently quoted, the new knowledge economy will rely heavily on knowledge workers who are not, as a rule, much better paid than traditional skilled workers but also see themselves as professionals. Knowledge technologists are likely to become the dominant social and perhaps, political force over the next decades. Thus, it is very important to have the right strategies in place to select, develop, manage and retain knowledge workers. But before...

    Employment, Human resource management, Knowledge economy 1068  Words | 4  Pages

  • Knowledge Management

    practice” in the context of knowledge management? Why is important to have “proven/best practices”? What are the basic functions of communities and associated examples? What are the approaches that make the “communities of practice” work for ConocoPhillips, Fluor, and Schlumberger? (p61-64) Knowledge retention has been a top priority for the Aerospace Corporation since its founding in 1960. Most of the programs in which Aerospace is involved go on for decades, making knowledge retention critical in the...

    Best practice, Knowledge, Knowledge management 1655  Words | 5  Pages

  • knowledge is power

    Bless me my lord Knowledge is power “A man without knowledge is like an idol” –Nidhi So knowledge is life and it gives power to human being which makes him different from the other living organism Knowledge according to Oxford dictionary is ‘’Facts, information, and skills acquired through experience or education; the theoretical or practical understanding of a subject’’ “No thief, however skillful, can rob one of knowledge, and that is why knowledge is the best and safest treasure to...

    Arjuna, Duryodhana, Human 1327  Words | 3  Pages

  • Benefits of Ecotourism

    traditions. It's then up to you to delve into your surroundings. I crossed more than a dozen countries overland in Africa and nature, or the environment, was the greatest attraction in every single one, whether the national parks in South Africa, the coastal marine life in Eritrea, the Simien Mountains of Ethiopia, or the shores of Lake Malawi. Along the way, I stopped in villages and often stayed in local homes rather than hotels or hostels, providing some income for villagers and living close to the...

    Endangered species, Environment, Environmentalism 1340  Words | 4  Pages

  • Mckinsey & Co. Managing Knowledge and Learning

    Michelle Abbott Professor Jon Down December 10, 2002 Written Case Analysis McKinsey & Company: Managing Knowledge and Learning Evaluating Gupta’s Four Pronged Plan Rajat Gupta has recently inherited a fast-growing consulting firm with a strong knowledge base and a competitive market position. In order to ensure the future success of McKinsey & Company, however, Gupta faces a number of challenges: he must provide outstanding services to an increasingly sophisticated clientele, offer his employees...

    Consultative selling, Customer, Customer service 1029  Words | 4  Pages

  • Knowledge Is Only Potential Power

    Kate Hamilton Teresa Cheatham English 1 25 July 2012 “Knowledge is Only Potential Power” The day a child enters the world; they are ignorantly bliss from the world around them. But is ignorance bliss? Society is a harsh place, and none know this better than the creature in Frankenstein. The creature is given the ability to think at a far higher level than the general public, and yet the only thing he wants is to be loved. Victor Frankenstein abandons his creature, like when a parent abandons...

    Emotion, Ethics, Frankenstein 2482  Words | 7  Pages

  • Potential Benefits of the Implementation of PPP

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