A Picture Tell Thousand Word

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As the old saying goes, “Reading is not generating the same result as seeing.” You can see from the meaning that we value seeing more than reading in terms of communication. The three most important elements in all forms of communication are sender, message and receiver. (Marie Gillespie and Jason Toynbee, 2006) Messages can be sent in several ways. Texts and images are two efficient ways of being sent. However, no one can deny the fact that, these days, we seem to pay more attention to images than texts due to a variety of reasons such as occasions and meaning. According to The Media Education Lab website of the University of Rhode Island (2012) mention that the difference between text and image is the level of representation, which People process text as narration while image as reality. Through enlargement of visual media, advertising company began to use images to communicate with audiences. An image can simultaneously provide several meanings. However, an image that is composed of many elements can sometimes cause more of an ambiguity resulting in the loss of the message of the image is. From the discussion below, the two cases of study will be given to demonstrate some examples of Images using in the advertising industry.

These two images are arranged and deliver information on a similar topic, but in different styles. According to Image 1, our first impression at a glance is humour even though it is an advertising campaign about the victims of car accidents The CCVR (The centre of consultancy for the road victims) attempts to deliver this message to the viewer “Well, It’s not like that. Usually, the victim is an innocent. Drive cautiously, save a life!” This organization advertised their campaign by changing our ideology. An ideology is a set of social values, ideas, beliefs, feelings and representations by which people collectively make sense of the world they live in. (Stadler and O'Shaughnessy, 2008). People began to believe...
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