A Comparative Study of Sindhi and Sanskrit Language Journalism

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A
 comparative
 study
 of
 Sindhi
 and
 Sanskrit
 Language
 Journalism
  Abstract
 
 
  Journalism
  in
  regional
  languages
  that
  are
  not
  mainstream
  have
  a
  number
 of
 challenges
 associated
 with
 it.
 While
 some
 regional
 languages
  like
  Hindi,
  Bengali,
  Malayalam
  etc.
  are
  flourishing
  even
  more
  than
  English
 language
 journalism,
 there
 is
 another
 class
 of
 regional
 languages
  that
  are
  not
  doing
  so
  well.
  This
  bring
  us
  to
  a
  question-­‐What
  are
  the
  factors
  that
  make
  a
  regional
  language
  prosper
  journalistically?
  Does
  it
  have
  anything
  to
  do
  with
  how
  long
  the
  language
  has
  been
  in
  use?
  Or
  does
 it
 have
 something
 to
 do
 with
 the
 people
 who
 speak
 the
 language?
 
  This
  study
  will
  draw
  a
  parallel
  between
  two
  different
  languages
  and
  journalism
  in
  these
  languages-­‐
  Sindhi
  and
  Sanskrit.
  While
  Sindhi
  has
  become
  a
  largely
  spoken
  less
  written
  language,
  Sanskrit
  has
  become
  a
  largely
 written
 seldom
 spoken
 kind
 of
 language.
 However
 both
 of
 them
  survive
 in
 similar
 conditions.
 Journalism
 in
 both
 these
 languages
 suffer
  from
  sub
  standard
  backing
  and
  circulation.
  While
  times
  are
  changing
  slowly,
 the
 situation
 of
 journalism
 in
 these
 languages
 is
 yet
 to
 mitigate.
  This
  study
  will
  aim
  at
  understanding
  the
  existing
  media
  landscape
  of
  publications
 in
 both
 these
 languages.
 It
 will
 also
 attempt
 to
 understand
  the
 reason
 behind
 the
 current
 scenario.
 And
 in
 conclusion,
 the
 study
 will
  aim
 at
 drawing
 a
 general
 consensus
 on
 the
 factors
 that
 help
 journalism
  in
 a
 language
 develop
 and
 sustain
 the
 test
 of
 time.
 
 
  Sindhi
 Language
 Journalism
 
 
  Sindhi
  is
  the
  native
  language
  of
  people
  who
  belong
  to
  the
  Sindhi
  province,
  which
  is
  in
  current
  day
  Pakistan.
  The
  language
  is
  an
  Indo
  Aryan
  dialect
  that
  takes
  inspiration
  from
  the
  Sanskrit
  language
  and
  blends
  it
  with
  a
  mix
  of
  Balochi.
  Before
  the
  standardization
  of
  Sindhi
  script
 several
 forms
 of
 Devnagari
 and
 Lunda
 script
 were
 developed
 for
  trade
 purposes.
 Religious
 and
 literary
 script
 was
 a
 blend
 of
 Ab-­‐ul-­‐Hassan
  Sindhi
 and
 Gurmukhi.
 
 In
 the
 19th
 century,
 an
 Arabic
 based
 orthography
  was
 accepted
 as
 standard.
 Devnagari
 script
 too
 was
 under
 consideration
  and
  was
  introduced
  by
  the
  Indian
  government
  in
  1948
  but
  was
  not
  widely
 accepted.
 
 
  Sindhi
 media
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