Year 10 Past Papers

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Year 10 English examination 2010 page 1

Year 10 English Examination

November 2010

* You have two hours to complete this examination

* You must write your answers on this paper and ask for extra paper if necessary.

* Use blue or black pen. Do not use twink.

* Attempt ALL questions.

Name: ____________________________________________________

Form Class: ____________________________________________________

English Teacher ____________________________________________________

| Time to take| Marks| Grade|
A. Written Language Comprehension| 20 mins| Achieved = 5 x AMerit = 2 x M & 4 x AExcellence = 1 x E & 5 x A/M| | B. Poetry Comprehension| 15 mins| Achieved = 3 x AMerit = 2 x M & 2 x AExcellence = 1 x E & 4 A/M| | C. Static ImageComprehension| 15 mins| Achieved = 3 x AMerit = 2 x M & 2 x AExcellence = 1 x E & 4 x A/M| | D. Film Section| 10 mins| Achieved / Merit / Excellence| | E. Literature Essay| 30 mins| Achieved / Merit / Excellence| | F. FormalEssay| 30 mins| Achieved / Merit / Excellence| | Total| 120 mins| OVERALL GRADE:| |

Year 10 English examination 2010 page 2
Section A Comprehension – Prose

Extract from North to the Night: a Spiritual Odyssey in the Arctic by Alvah Simon

The Roger Henry was stuck against a high ice island forty feet long, a perfect platform from which the bear could pounce. The boat itself would not be a visual deterrent because, instead of painting it in the traditional Arctic red, we had left it white, hoping it would help us approach wildlife closely. From the beach, the massive 5 predator had seen nothing out of the ordinary, just two fat seals on a block of ice.

Although ungainly on land, once under the sea he moved gracefully, rolling along like a tsunami beneath the milky veneer. The ripple stopped, and the bear poked his head through the ice as if it were paper. He sank silently and, with sweeps of his great forelegs, slinked forward again, and again, each time punching through the 10 crust closer and closer, probing with those keen nostrils. The white shadow beneath the ice angled behind the adjacent floe. For a dreadful moment I could not find him. I spun around – over which rail would he explode? Then I saw a discolouration in a brash pool at the floe’s edge. With the stealth of a crocodile, he lifted his brow out of the slush. When those cold, calculating eyes locked on mine, I heard a lonely wind 15whistle through my bleached bones.

In the game of predator and prey, events unfold slowly through the exchange of sound and smell and through distance, but eye contact triggers explosive action. He knew we had seen him and that the element of surprise was lost, so he quickly sought his second-best advantage – high ground. He burst out of the water onto the 20 tall pan, looming above us, fully exposed in awful dimension.

I mouthed the same words I heard Diana shout: “Oh my God!”

He was enormous but thin. Thin means hungry, but I was too fascinated to turn away. My instincts shouted to fall back, run away, yet my muscles drew me forward as if I were caught in some magnetic force field. His brow furrowed. He was thinking, Yes 25 they have seen me, but they have not snap-rolled into the water as all seals do. This is different. He hesitated.

I slowly reached back for the camera, thinking, There are people who would die for this photo. The bear quivered, flexing that half-ton of taut muscle. He poised to pounce. Well forget the photo. I wished my heart would quit making so much noise, 30 so I could concentrate. I slid my hand into my jacket and pulled out a miniature compressed-air horn. The bear’s eyes riveted on my movement, his butt twitched, and his sharp claws curled into the ice, ready for takeoff. The horn’s timely shriek shattered the frozen silence. The beast shook his great head at the...
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