Wit Ethics

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The film “Wit” shed light on events that sadly do occur in a hospital setting. Doctors, nurses, and other staff members in the midst of work, forget that their patients are human. In the beginning of the film, Vivian Bearing, a professor is diagnosed with stage four ovarian cancers which are metastasizing. (Later in the film Vivian admits she had not gone to the doctor in five years, that is contributory negligence on her part.) Her doctor, Dr. Kalekian, very coldly tells informs her of her diagnoses. Speaking to her, he sounds egotistical and arrogant. He does not even mention her prognosis. He asks if she would be interested in taking part of a research project. She would be required to take full doses of chemotherapy and medications. It would be “tough”, but it was the “the most effective treatment modality”. She signs the informed consent just minutes after hearing such heavy news. I questioned her autonomy. She was not informed that a physical was required. She learns that the resident that will be examining her is in fact a former student of hers. After being left spread eagle on an examination table with no dignity and the absence of a female nurse, (even with professional autonomy, a female nurse must be present). I recall resident Jason Posner stating bedside manners were a “colossal waste of time for researchers”. After female nurse is present he openly discusses his experience in her class during the exam. Feeling the mass he yells “Jesus!” this is highly lacked professionalism. The experiment was in patient, so Grand Rounds were made, where students took notes on the subject being researched. Vivian accepts the utilitarian justification of training young physicians and the necessity of putting up with the accompanying irritation and discomforts. Dr. Kalekian not once spoke to Vivian about hospice. When Vivian says “Let it stop”, they put her down as a DNR, even then, Dr. Kalekian didn’t come to discuss her prognosis or her code status. If...
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