What Is Philosophy of Religion

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1. What is Philosophy of religion?
 is a branch of philosophy that asks questions about religion. Philosophy of religion is a branch of philosophy that asks questions about religion. It addresses not only the perennial question “Is there a God?” but also the questions If there is, then what is he like? and, most important of all, What does that mean for us? 2. Give a brief history of the “philosophies” of religion. Ancient Philosophy,Medieval Philosophy, Early Modern Philosophy, Nineteenth-Century Philosophy,Twelth-century philosophy. Philiophers like that of Plato, Aristotle, St. Aquinas, Sartre, Hegel, St. Anselm etc. 3. What is the human position on the principle of causality in relation to the existence of God and the world?

4. What is an ontological argument? What is the distinguishing feature of St. Anselm’s theism that makes it ontological? An ontological argument for the existence of God attempts the method of a priori proof, which uses intuition and reason alone. 5. What is a cosmological argument? Explain St. Aquinas’ argument from design. The cosmological argument is an argument for the existence of a First Cause (or instead, an Uncaused cause) to the universe, and by extension is often used as an argument for the existence of an "unconditioned" or "supreme" being, usually then identified as God. It is traditionally known as an argument from universal causation, an argument from first cause, the causal argument or theargument from existence. Whichever term is employed, there are three basic variants of the argument, each with subtle yet important distinctions: the arguments from causation, in esse and in fieri, and the argument from contingency. 6. What differentiates Paley’s theism from St. Aquinas’? Paley describes the whole universe as a machine, a machine that was designed and created by an intelligent being. While Aquinas’ argument ask does an all powerful God exists. 7. Use your own example to explain the objectivity of...
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