What Is Organizational

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What Is Organizational Psychology
Michelle Kylen
Psych 570
May 20, 2013
Anthony Casas

What Is Organizational Psychology
This paper will consist of what organizational psychology is about. The following will define organizational psychology. The explanation of the evolution in organizational psychology will consist of the following information. This paper will show the comparison and the contrast of organizational psychology, and it will consist of two disciplines that will relate to the comparison and contrast. This paper will consist of information that applies to organizational psychology.

Define Organizational Psychology
Organizational psychology are groups of people coming together for a common cause (Jex & Britt, 2008). There are two types of organization that consist of informal and formal organization (Jex & Britt, 2008). Informal organization is a group of personal and social relationships get together in a work environment (Business Dictionary, 2013). Informal organization consists of a football team, soccer team, and basketball team. In sports team coaches recruit from other teams to make each team a better team and in these teams each person becomes a friend to make it at team. Formal organization is the rules that are a part of the organization in governing procedures as well as operations (Business Dictionary, 2013). Formal organization consists of the United Nations. The UN has rules that govern for them to follow to keep peace between the countries that are a part of the United Nations. Organizational psychology uses scientific methods to attempt in understanding the behavior of individuals with goals in a workplace in organizations of productive, effective, and efficiency (Jex & Britt, 2008).

Explain the Evolution of the Field of Organizational Psychology
Organizational psychology consists of a sub-category in industrial/organizational psychology (Katzell & Austin, 1992). In industrial/organizational psychology there are some earliest pioneers are Hugo Munsterberg, Walter Bingham, and Walter Dill Scott (Katzell & Austin, 1992). The three pioneers dealt with things such as personal acquisition, and skill acquisition instead of dealing with behavior (Katzell & Austin, 1992). Organizational psychology has its own category that heavily influences by Frederick Winslow Taylor (Katzell & Austin, 1992). Frederick is a non-psychologist and advances the doctrines of scientific management (Katzell & Austin, 1992). There are three important principles concerning Taylor’s work. The first principle consists of designs that people other than those who perform it to work on it (Jex & Britt, 2008). The second principle is how workers who receive incentives will work more diligently (Jex & Britt, 2008). The third principle consists of how the workplace issues be subjective to empirical study (Jex & Britt, 2008). Organizational psychology as its own category measures with distrust and with dislikes bureaucracies that was an outcome of organizational psychology (Jex & Britt, 2008).

Compare and Contrast Organizational Psychology with at Least Two Related Disciplines
Organizational psychology is the study of individual behavior in an organization (Jex & Britt, 2008). Organizational behavior is separate and also distinct (Jex & Britt, 2008). Organizational behavior goes two steps further than organizational psychology that consists of considering how an individual behaves or interacts concerning an organization, and the behavior of an organization itself (Jex & Britt, 2008). Organizational psychology continues by how an individual interacts with an organization, and how the organization behaves (Jex & Britt, 2008). Organizational psychology and organizational behavior both influence in...
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