Violent Video Games

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Violent Video Games
The future of entertainment revolves around technology. Video games become more and more realistic. The main consumers for violent video games are teens and young adults. These games encourage killing and fighting enemies. More ways of playing violent video games are created each year, but most of us have this question in mind. Violent video games influence young people to act aggressively, too much video game playing makes children socially isolated, and some video games teach children the wrong values. An effect of violent video games is an increase of aggression. An incident where a kid showed aggression from a video game is when a man named Adam Lanza, the troubled young man who killed 27 children and adults in the Newtown, Connecticut shootings last December, was said to have been obsessed with violent video games. In 2011, Anders Breivik, did a sequential bombing and mass shooting on July 22 2011, he bombed government buildings in Oslo, resulting in eight deaths. Then carried out a mass shooting at a camp of the Workers' Youth League (AUF) of the Labour Party on the island of Utøya, where he killed 69 people, mostly teenagers. He was convicted of mass murder, causing a fatal explosion, and terrorism in August 2012. During the trail, Anders Breivik told the court that he had trained for the massacre by playing Call of Duty. In 98 percent of games, the acts they commit are unpunished and in more than half of video games, perpetrators of violence are rewarded. Another incident where aggression is on April 20, 1999, Eric Harris and Dylan Klebold launched an assault on Columbine High School in Littleton, Colorado, murdering 13 and wounding 23 before turning the guns on themselves. Although nothing is for certain as to why these boys did what they did, we do know that Harris and Klebold both enjoyed playing the bloody, shoot-'em-up video game Doom, a game licensed by the U.S. military to train soldiers to effectively kill.
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