Us Decline as Only Superpower

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The Decline Of the United States as the Worlds Only Super Power

The United States has experienced a steady decline as the world’s only super power, and this steady decline will continue until the United States is no longer the world’s hegemonic state. There are a number of factors that directly influence this decrease in power from the United States on the world stage including: a struggle to sustain economic hegemony in part due to the outsourcing of manufacturing jobs and plants; the rise of eastern powers and other booming economies; the limiting U.S. foreign policy. The cascading effect of these factors poses a great threat to the western world and will ultimately drive the United States to lose its status as the world’s sole super power in the global power shift of the 21st Century.

The United States is feeling competitive pressure on its global status as a result of the economic emergence of the BRIC countries (Brazil, Russia, India, and China). These nations represent roughly 40% of global population and some

Since the Industrial Revolution, the manufacturing of goods has played a significant role in the United States’ economy; the manufacturing sector has historically provided a substantial portion of middle class jobs in America. However, in the recent years a large number of those manufacturing jobs have been outsourced overseas.[1] Outsourcing labor benefits manufacturers and multi national corporations because they can dominate the markets through the acquisition of low-cost labor and by limiting their exposure to regulation and taxation while translating into an increase in profits for stakeholders. However, the movement of a large amount of manufacturing jobs overseas employs negative effects on the United States working class, due to a reduction of jobs and sufficient wages.

 

The failure to invest in domestic job creation and the outsourcing of American jobs to foreign countries has undoubtedly contributed to soaring corporate profits, but these profits come at a clear cost. That cost is incurred by workers in the U.S. that have lost or are at risk of losing their job due to outsourcing.[2] Manufacturing employment collapsed from a high of 19.5 million workers in June 1979 to 11.5 million workers in December 2009 - a drop of 8 million workers in a span of 30 years. Between August 2000 and February 2004, manufacturing job opportunities decreased for 43 consecutive months - the longest stretch of employment scarcity since the Great Depression. In the last decade, manufacturing plants have also declined at alarming rates shrinking by more than 51,000 plants between 1998 and 2008. [3] These stable, middle-class jobs have been the driving force of the U.S. economy for decades and the loss of this stability has done considerable damage to manufacturing opportunities for middle-class workers and communities across the entire country. Due to the outsourcing of these jobs, economies overseas have multiplied. The middle class economies in the BRIC countries continue to expand and gain power due to a large number of jobs that result in a well-fueled economy. Meanwhile, the United States has seen a depressed economy with an unemployment rate that is well above the natural rate.

Evidence that these economies, specifically the BRIC nations, have been expanding economically is presented by the fuel consumption and escalating coal shipments. The spreading economic growth is predicted to lead China and India to more than double their combined energy demand by 2035, accounting for one-half of the world's energy growth according to EIA's recently released International Energy Outlook 2011, IEO2011. The IEO2011 projects that China and India will consume 31% of the world's total energy in the year 2035, up from 21% in 2008. China, which surpassed the United States as the world's largest energy...
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