Un Specialized Agencies

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TABLE OF CONTENTS
INTRODUCTION;
* HISTORICAL BACKGROUND OF UNICEF
* Definition of key terms
* UNICEF OBJECTIVES
* ROLES of UNICEF

* MAIN BODY
* FUNCTIONS OF UNICEF

* RECOMMENDUTION
* CONCLUSION
* REFERENCES

Historical background of UNICEF
From its start in 1946, UNICEF took upon itself the mandate to feed the impoverished, improve their health, and provide clothing to the children of Europe. After becoming a permanent member of the UN is 1953, UNICEF’s first campaign became combating “against yaws, a disfiguring disease affecting millions of children This was UNICEF’s first real campaign outside of World War II pertaining to an issue that effected children of the entire world. Later in 1959, the UN adopted the Declaration of Rights of the Child which defined children’s rights to protection, education, health care, shelter and good nutrition. This declaration laid a strong foundation for UNICEF, a foundation that for years would be the heartbeat of its many actions protecting the rights of children then in 1961, UNICEF broadened its interest by adding to the list of a child’s rights education and providing equal opportunities to all children. Four years later, UNICEF was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize “for the promotion of brotherhood among nations. When giving UNICEF the Nobel Peace Prize Mrs. Abase Lionaes, a Member of the Nobel Committee said this, “In an age when so many people are terrified of the destructive effects of the forces that science has placed in our hands, UNICEF offers young people in all countries an alternative worth living and working for a world with: Freedom for all people, Equality between all races, Brotherhood among all men. The responsible use of science in the forms of sanitation and medication became the marks of UNICEF’s world changing agenda. In 1982 UNICEF launched a drive to protect the health and well-being of millions of children around the world. This went by the name of Child Survival and Development Revolution. This simple low-cost revolution called for four techniques: growth monitoring, oral rehydration therapy, breast-feeding and immunization. Effects of this drive still reverberate through the world today as children are provided better health care now than at any other point in history. A few short years later in 1989, a Convention on the Rights of the Child was held. The goal and purpose of this Convention was to reaffirm to the international community the rights of children as defined in1959 by the Declaration of the Rights of a Child, specifically that “the child, by reason of his physical and mental immaturity, needs special safeguards and care, including appropriate legal protection, before as well as after birth. This document is thought to be one of the most well received human rights treaties to ever exist. The next year in New York City a World Summit for Children was called. This Summit’s attendance was made up of Heads of State and Government’s from all around the world. Here important goals were set for the future of children in the lines of education, nutrition and health. Then following up on the World Summit for Children, in 2002 a special session was held in the UN General Assembly to discuss the failures and accomplishments of the goals of the Summit. This special session was also intended to re-energize the world its passion to protect children across the nations.

, UNICEUNITED NATIONS INTERNATIONAL CHILDREN’S EMERGENCY FUND UNICEFF
Is an integral part of the United Nations system It has its own governing body; an Executive Board that sets policies, reviews programmes and approves budgets. With headquarters in New York, UNICEF carries out its work through eight regional offices and 125 country offices (figures effective as of 31 December 1998). Its research center known as “Innocent Research Centre” is located in Florence. Also; UNICEF stands for United Nations Children's Fund. It is a subsidiary...
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