Tropicana Marketing

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  • Topic: Citrus, Orange Juice, Juice
  • Pages : 5 (1259 words )
  • Download(s) : 683
  • Published : December 5, 2012
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Tropicana
1. Situation Analysis
1. Mission
2. Industry Analysis
1. PEST
2. Five Forces
3. Competitor Analysis
3. Critical Success Factors Matrix
4. Company and Management Background
4. Team
5. Legal Structure
6. Protection (patents, copyrights, etc.)
7. Macro SWOT Analysis
2. MACRO Challenges, Goals and Objectives
3. Segmentation
5. Define potential market segments
8. MACRO by Perception
9. MICRO by Characteristics
10. Defining Positioning
11. MICRO Challenges, Goals and Objectives
12. Micro SWOT Analysis
6. Select Segments to Target
4. Marketing Mix
7. Product Elements
13. Tangible Product Elements
1. Physical product or service
2. Individual features
3. Quality level
4. Accessories
14. Intangible Product Features
5. Installation
6. Instructions
7. Product Line membership
15. Brand
16. Package
17. Warranty
1.1
Mission statement:

Our mission is to be the world's premier consumer products company focused on convenient foods and beverages. 

1.2history
Prior to the late 1940s, consumers obtained orange and grapefruit juices from either squeezing fresh fruit at home or from canned juice. In the 1940s, as part of the U.S. program to ship food products to its allies, more effort was made to develop an orange juice product that would closely approximate the quality of fresh orange juice in a form that would not spoil quickly and still be available year-round. By the mid-1940s, through the combined research efforts of the Florida Citrus Commission and the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), a type of frozen concentrated orange juice was developed in which the juice was concentrated five- to eight-fold by vacuum evaporation, then diluted with freshly extracted juice to a three- or four-fold concentrate, and then frozen. he growth in demand for FCOJ in the 1950s and 1960s led to the emergence and growth of citrus processors and an increased market focus by the citrus industry. uring the 1970s, stimulated by strong, growing orange juice markets, world orange juice supplies (from Florida and an emerging Brazilian citrus industry) doubled, which enabled the U.S. market share to grow by 68 percent. An historical evaluation of the U.S. orange juice market prior to 1980 showed a market that had demonstrated continuous strong growth with only two major U.S. brands (Minute Maid and Tropicana), which together held only about a 33 percent share, the rest being held by private labels, packer labels, and regional brands.

1.3 industry profile
A unique characteristic of both orange and grapefruit juice (hereafter referred to together as citrus juices) is that consumers can and do squeeze fresh oranges and grapefruit at home, when citrus is in season. In contrast, other fruit juices, such as apple, grape or pineapple, are not as easily made at home, thus most consumers are unfamiliar with the fresh-squeezed taste of these other fruit juice varieties. Consequently, the term "fresh-squeezed" has set a taste standard for orange and grapefruit juice that most other fruit juices do not have. Citrus juices deteriorate quickly once the fruit is squeezed. Enzymes in citrus juices, mainly pectin esterase, cause loss of cloudiness, changes in mouth feel, and deterioration of flavor. The high sugar content in citrus juices causes bacteria, yeasts, and molds to grow rapidly and produce off-flavors. Processes have been developed that increase the time of flavor stability of citrus juices, but the trade-off compromises the flavor of the juice. Finally, as women have taken jobs outside the home and consumers' real disposable incomes have grown, consumers have increasingly demonstrated a preference for and placed...
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